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Food Allergy Statistics

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More Adults Have Food Allergies Than Previously Believed

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Last month, we shared the latest research on food allergy trends among children. The study found that approximately 7.6%—or 6 million—kids in the U.S. have a food allergy. Now we have more breaking food allergy news to share—this time concerning adults.

In early January, The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published a study on the prevalence of food allergies among U.S. adults. What did they discover? Approximately 1 in 10 American adults (~26 million) have a food allergy. 

This brings the total number of Americans with a food allergy to approximately 32 million, more than doubling the food allergy population! Previous estimates had the population at roughly 15 million Americans.

Below are a few more key findings:

  • Adult onset of food allergies is becoming more common; nearly half of food-allergic adults have at least one food allergy that began in adulthood.

  • The most common allergies among adults are shellfish (7.2 million), milk (4.7 million), peanuts (4.5 million), tree nuts (3 million), and fin fish (2.2 million).

  • Food allergies occur more often in non-white adults than in white adults.

  • Nearly 40% of adults with a food allergy reported at least one food allergy-related ER visit in their lifetime.

  • Adults ages 30-39 had higher rates of food allergy than younger adults. Adults over 60 had lower rates than other adult age groups.

Dr. Ruchi Gupta and her team at Northwestern University conducted both the adult and pediatric studies. Consistent with their research on children, Dr. Gupta’s team applied a stringent symptom methodology, which looked at the frequency, type, and severity of allergy symptoms as part of diagnosis to filter out those who more likely had a food intolerance. 

One thing is clear: food allergies are on the rise, and we need greater education, awareness, and research on this troubling health trend. 

A big thanks to Dr. Gupta and her team for their ongoing efforts to shine a light on the rising food allergy epidemic in our country.

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Breaking Bread

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This past Christmas Eve, I listened to the soft sounds of Ave Maria and Silent Night waft through candlelit pews. My father has sung in a church choir ever since I was a child, like his father before him, so from a young age I was instilled with an appreciation for robed singers harmonizing centuries-old Latin hymns. I’m also a sucker for Christmas carols. 😉

As the communion bread was passed around among the pews, I thought about people who could not eat the bread—not because they weren’t baptized, but because they were allergic or intolerant.

Growing up, our family belonged to a small stone Episcopalian church on a grassy hill that could have been pulled out of the Scottish Highlands or a child’s storybook. At one point, we had a female priest, which was something of a rarity back then. Sermons routinely invoked global current affairs and the common values shared across religions, and everyone, regardless of creed, was welcome. We were a progressive church. The communion bread was also baked in the church kitchen and tasted heavenly. I’d walk up to the altar, cup my hands, and receive a hunk of doughy bread, which I’d dip into a chalice of wine. I can’t remember ever worrying about my food allergies during Sunday communion growing up. Plain bread as a kid was always considered safe. That has since changed. 

Today, 1 in 13 kids has a food allergy, and millions more have a gluten intolerance. We live in a different world from a couple decades back. The communion bread I ate growing up definitely contained wheat, although I never knew anyone that had a problem with gluten back then. These days, however, it seems as though at least one person at every dinner party is gluten-free. To accommodate, many churches now offer gluten-free bread with communion.

The rise of gluten-free products has been a double-edged sword for the nut-allergic like me: on the one hand, it has helped increase awareness and accommodations for those with food allergies and intolerances; on the other hand, nut substitutes (like almond flour) for wheat have become increasingly common. 

Years ago, I admittedly thought the spike in gluten-free products was more fad than the result of a growing severe medical condition. That all changed when I spoke to a woman at a food allergy conference years back who relayed the harrowing experience of her young son and how their family discovered his gluten intolerance. On Sundays, her son would develop debilitating migraines that would keep him bed ridden for days. As she described her experience, and his symptoms, I was horrified. Her family connected the dots back to the communion bread. “Gluten did that to your son!?” I thought. Unfortunately, their church wasn’t able to accommodate his gluten intolerance, and her family was forced to join another parish. 

At the Scottish storybook church, if you declined the bread or wine, you could fold your arms across your chest and receive a blessing from the priest. At the church I attended this Christmas Eve, communion bread was passed between parishioners in pews on trays, and wine (which turned out to be grape juice), was served in small plastic cups. Surprisingly, an individual blessing did not appear to be an alternative option. You’d think a simple blessing like this would be an option at all churches, allowing everyone to partake in communion and ensuring that the food allergic and intolerant aren’t left out.

Religion, like food, should bring people together. Breaking bread has long been a symbol of community and peace. That community piece is lost, however, if everyone isn’t afforded a seat at the table. 

- Abi & the Allergy Amulet Team

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Emerging Epidemic: Latest Research on Childhood Food Allergies Shows Troubling Trend

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We like to follow research in the food allergy world closely—after all, many of our team members are as personally vested as we are professionally in the advancement of food allergy research! Several of our senior team members either have food allergies or have children with food allergies. 

Last month at FABlogCon, we learned that Dr. Ruchi Gupta and her team at Northwestern University were soon releasing a new study in PediatricsThe Public Health Impact of Parent-Reported Childhood Food Allergies in the United States.

The study was published this month, and we wanted to share some key findings with you: 

  • Food allergies continue to affect a significant number of children in the United States—7.6 percent, or nearly 6 million kids, have a food allergy. Of those, 40 percent report having multiple food allergies.

  • Food allergies have a meaningful impact on families—42 percent reported a severe allergic reaction to their food allergen, and nearly 1 in 5 reported that their child had visited the emergency department for a food-allergic reaction in the past year!

  • Not everyone has emergency medicines at the ready—less than half of parents reported that their child has a current prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector, the only treatment for anaphylaxis. 

This study is a continuation of the work carried out by Dr. Gupta and her team in 2011. Their objective was to better assess the public health impact on childhood food allergies. They surveyed over 40,000 households using advanced statistical modeling to ensure they captured a representative sample of children in the United States. 

One noteworthy feature of this study was a “stringent symptom” methodology, which looked at the frequency, type, and severity of allergy symptoms as part of a diagnosis. This approach helped filter out those who did not likely have a food allergy, as several parents reported a food allergy when the symptoms were more characteristic of a food intolerance or oral allergy syndrome (OAS).

Even after applying the stricter criteria, food allergies are still a significant problem for American children. Today, 1 in 13 kids has a food allergy, which translates to 2 in every classroom. Peanut (2.2%) and milk (1.9%) are the most commonly reported food allergies, affecting 1.6 million and 1.4 million children, respectively. African American children are also more likely to have a food allergy than non-Hispanic white children and are more likely than other children to have multiple food allergies. 

Dr. Gupta (second from the left on the bottom row) and her SOAAR research team (Science and Outcomes of Allergy and Asthma Research) at Northwestern University.

Dr. Gupta (second from the left on the bottom row) and her SOAAR research team (Science and Outcomes of Allergy and Asthma Research) at Northwestern University.

We appreciate the work of Dr. Gupta and her team to increase awareness of the public health implications of food allergies. To quote from the study: “With the growing epidemic and life-threatening nature of food allergies, developing treatments and prevention strategies are critical.” 

We couldn’t agree more!

- Susannah & the Allergy Amulet Team 


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