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Transparency

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Humans Are Pooping Plastic

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Got your attention? Thought so. 😉

If you’re thinking, What does poop have to do with food allergies? First, food allergies affect our health and diet, which implicates our digestive tract. Number two, research is increasingly looking to the gut for answers around the rise in food allergies. For these reasons, we thought the topic was a-poo-priate. 💩

This past summer, Austrian researchers reported that the deluge of plastic entering our environment is now entering our stool. That’s right—plastic has been discovered in 114 aquatic species90% of seabirds, and now, evidently, in us. 

As part of this first-of-its-kind study, researchers followed eight volunteers from a handful of European countries, tracked their consumption habits, and then sampled their stool. Small fibers of plastic—known as microplastics—were found in all participants’ feces to varying degrees, amounting to the first documentation of plastic in human feces to date. The findings confirmed what many scientists have long suspected: we’re eating plastic.

Scientists are now grappling with the health implications, which are largely unknown. Microplastics are capable of damaging the reproductive and gastrointestinal systems in sea life, but little is known about their impact on humans.

On average, 13 billion microplastic particles enter US waterways every day through the municipal water supply. An estimated 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans each year. The latter bulk of plastic gets broken down into smaller bits, which are eaten by smaller organisms, and make their way up the food chain.

How does this relate to the food allergy and intolerance community? 

First, we know that immune health is closely tied to food allergies and intolerances. Experts have found that plastic in the gut can suppress the immune system and increase the likelihood of gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease. Second, research has shown that exposure to phthalates, which are found in many plastics, can increase childhood risk of allergies. According to the lead researcher of the study, Dr. Philipp Schwabi: “[my] primary concern is the human impact… especially [on] patients with gastrointestinal diseases.” He notes that “the smallest particles are capable of entering the bloodstream, the lymphatic system and may even reach the liver.”

While research on the human impact of plastic is still early, one thing is clear: plastic may be harming our immune systems, which could potentially implicate our body’s ability to tolerate and digest certain foods.

We’re eating our waste—that much is clear. Now the question is, what are we going to do about it? 

-      Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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The Secret is Out: Transparency is In

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Last fall, Kellogg’s acquired a protein bar startup called RXBAR for $600M dollars. The significance of that deal is twofold. First is the story behind the company: two childhood friends built the business out of their kitchen with $5,000 each and no outside funding. Second, their brand was built on transparency and candor: each bar neatly lists a handful of ingredients on the front packaging followed by their signature motto: “No B.S.”

The market took notice.

In an era where food labels list hard-to-pronounce ingredients like “tartrazine” and “disodium inosinate” and include vague statements like “may contain” (which we wrote a separate blog post about), consumers are unsurprisingly gravitating towards products like RXBAR.

But the trend isn’t limited to food. Increasingly, shoppers are looking to company values—including a company’s commitment to transparency—when making purchase decisions. More consumers are looking beyond price tag and factoring in product origin, reputation, and quality and ethical standards. The rise of fair trade, organic, and Certified B Corporations (“B Corps”) is a testament to shifting consumer preferences. Consumers are also looking at where companies donate politically: with a new app from startup Goods Unite Us, consumers can run political background checks on products to see what political party their purchase indirectly supports.

Corporate candor is a hot commodity right now. That much is clear.

A Label Insight study looking at consumer behavior around food and personal care products found that nearly 40% of consumers would switch from their preferred brand to one that offered more product transparency. A quarter of respondents indicated that transparency was the leading reason they remained loyal to brands.

We live in a digital age where consumers have access to unprecedented levels of information. In turn, they are using that information to scrutinize company decision-making and hold companies accountable for those decisions. The businesses that are quickest to adapt will likely outperform and outlive their peers.

Investors see the appeal.

Investors routinely evaluate the risk of any potential deal or transaction. Transparency helps mitigate these risks by identifying blind spots, which can in turn reduce reputational, compliance, and financial risk. Transparency also fosters trust: the foundation of any business relationship.

The metrics of business success do not always account for intangibles like transparency and trust—but they should. Facebook is learning that the hard way this month, as user numbers drop and #DeleteFacebook becomes a trending hashtag.

Trust is hard to earn, difficult to quantify, and easily lost. For these reasons, trust is arguably the most valuable commodity a company holds. The precursor to trust is transparency.

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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