Viewing entries tagged
allergic reaction

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Killer Beauty Regimens

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When we think about managing food allergies, we don’t tend to consider lipstick or lotion. But we should.

Walking down the aisle of my local co-op recently, I grabbed a tub of moisturizer labeled “tester” and applied a dab to my hand. I tried placing the scent, and when I couldn’t, turned the jar around and saw almond oil listed as the first ingredient. My stomach clenched, and a variant of “shoot” slipped from my mouth. I’m deathly allergic to tree nuts. I washed my hands immediately, and fortunately, I was fine. Historically, my worst skin exposure outcome is hives. However, given the unpredictability of allergic reactions, it’s still hard not to panic. 

You’d think after all these years and several close calls I’d be more careful; but when it comes to skincare and beauty products, I routinely let down my guard. I shouldn’t.

Did I sufficiently give you a fright? 

Good. Sometimes a little fear is a good thing. Especially when you’re talking about something as serious as an allergic reaction! 

For the food allergic, even moderate skin exposure can be serious. Creams, soaps, oils, make-up, lipstick, and balms can also lead to small amounts of ingestion, so it’s important for those with food allergies and their loved ones to vet these items with the same diligence they do foods. Don’t forget vitamins, teas, and herbal supplements, too! 

Beware the two S’s: spas and salons. 

Planning a massage, manicure, or haircut? Make sure you tell your massage therapist or stylist to avoid products containing your allergen. This is especially true if you’re allergic to nuts—you’d be surprised how many spas and salons use nut oils. Just last month while getting my haircut I was surrounded by advertisements for the salon’s newest cherry almond shampoos and conditioners. Suffice it to say, I steered clear of this product line. 😉 

FDA labeling laws and cosmetics.

Skincare and beauty products are not regulated in the same way that foods are for allergens—even if they contain a common allergenic ingredient! 

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), which we explore in an earlier blog, applies to FDA-regulated food products, not cosmetics and beauty products. Accordingly, these products do not need to adhere to FALCPA labeling requirements, although many brands list these ingredients anyway. Regardless, it’s worth taking note.

We hope this information hasn’t spooked you, although it is Halloween season! Rather, we hope this knowledge helps you stay informed and safe when managing your food allergies. So before you slather on some blood-red lipstick this All Hallow’s Eve, check that label!

Wishing you all a BOO-tiful Halloween! 👻🎃

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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My Child Doesn’t Have a Food Allergy... But Her Friends Do

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When my family moved to a new neighborhood five years ago, we quickly learned that our new neighbors’ oldest son had a severe peanut allergy. Our children became fast friends, and the kids went back and forth between the two houses all the time. None of our three children have food allergies, so this was very new to us. To ensure that he was safe while under our care, we knew we had to get up to speed on how to keep him out of harm’s way (and well fed!).

Here are the top 10 tips we’ve learned, in case you find yourself in a similar situation:

1)    Ask the Question. Inviting a new friend over for a play date or sharing snacks at the park? Always ask the other parent or caregiver if their child has any food allergies. Allergy parents are often grateful if you bring it up!

2)    Read Labels. Get to know the ingredients of the snack foods you regularly buy. Which granola bars contain tree nuts? Which crackers are made in a facility that processes peanuts? At a minimum, know where to look on the packaging to find allergen info. I’m often surprised when a food I would have considered to be nut-free actually isn’t. We’ve created a cheat sheet for you to learn the rules of label reading!

3)    Keep the Original Packaging. It’s so much easier to check the ingredient list on a box of crackers if it is still in the original packaging. Often, similar products made by different companies have different allergy warnings and ingredients. 

4)    Have Allergen-Free Snacks on Hand. Consider offering fresh fruits, veggies, or cheese for kids who can eat dairy. We’ve found that parents of kids with allergies are happy to make suggestions for healthy and safe snacks that everyone can enjoy. As an added bonus, minimally processed foods are healthier anyway!

5)    Think About Cross-Contact. When you make a PB&J for your child, does the knife go in both jars? If so, that jam may contain peanuts. I try to use two different knives, but if we have a friend over with a peanut allergy, I open a new jar of jam rather than risk an allergic reaction.

6)    Keep Up the Hand Washing. We all know we should have kids wash hands before eating, but what about afterwards? If your kids eat a peanut butter sandwich, be mindful that their hands may have peanut residue on them, which could pose a risk to those with peanut allergies! Post-meal hand washing also helps keep those toys clean! 🙌  

7)    Think Outside the House. When we carpool with the neighbor that has a peanut allergy, I wipe down the car handles and other surfaces that our kids touch, especially since our family often eats in the car! Let’s be honest, don’t we all? 😉

8)    Make Birthday Parties Inclusive. Ask about food allergies on the invitation. For an electronic invite, you can list what you are planning to serve. We have a child in one of my kids’ friend groups with an egg allergy. His mom is always willing to bring alternative snacks and treats, so a heads up is appreciated in case she needs to plan ahead! 

9)    Know and Support Your School’s Rules. Our elementary school has some classrooms that are nut free, so we always pack nut-free snacks. The lunchrooms are generally nut friendly, with designated nut-free tables. If my child wants to eat with a friend who sits at the nut-free table, he also needs a nut-free lunch. It’s important to avoid undermining the school’s allergen policies. There are plenty of delicious food options for your child that will also keep their friends safe!

10)   Make it Easy on Older Kids. Older kids don’t want you hyper-managing their food choices, especially when they aren’t your children. Make it easy for teens and tweens to self-manage their food allergies by offering plenty of safe options and letting them choose. 

With these guidelines in place, we have been able to successfully navigate the food allergy terrain while keeping our children’s friends safe (and bellies full!).

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Peter Rabbit: A Tale of Teachable Moments

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On February 9th, Sony Pictures released its long-awaited movie that modernizes the classic tale of Peter Rabbit—the mischievous little bunny that chases about the garden of grumpy old Mr. McGregor.

While this contemporary rendition has generated lots of laughter and merriment nationwide, it’s also making headlines for the upheaval it’s unleashed in the food allergy community.

In case this is news to you, here’s what happens. The young bunny family discovers that grouchy Mr. McGregor is allergic to blackberries. In their attempt to keep him from monopolizing the affection of their beloved Miss Bea, they launch blackberries at him, one of which lands squarely in his mouth. Mr. McGregor starts to experience trouble breathing and promptly injects epinephrine into his thigh. He then swiftly recovers and starts chasing the bunnies, as if nothing happened. Peter Rabbit even goes so far as to say: “Allergic to blackberries! Is that even a thing? Everyone is allergic to everything! Stop using it as a crutch!”

When I heard the news of the blackberry scene, I was frustrated. The food allergy community has made considerable progress in education, awareness, and teaching kids to be sensitive to those with food allergies. For a major motion picture that targets children to portray food allergies so carelessly (and epinephrine inaccurately) felt like a major step backward.

HOWEVER…

I believe there are some huge positives that came out of the film.

First, this movie has catapulted food allergies into major national news. This New York Times article came out three days after the movie’s release. Press around this incident reached a wide audience, which hopefully helped move the needle forward on food allergy education within the general population.

Most importantly, I viewed this film as a great opportunity to create a teachable moment with my food-allergic daughter. Before seeing the movie, we chatted about the blackberry scene and what she would see. We talked about what really happens when you experience an allergic reaction, and most importantly, about the importance of having compassion for others that are different. We use food allergies in our house as a platform to show our children that everyone has attributes that make them unique—and that differences are not a bad thing! Some of their friends may have food allergies, others might wear glasses, and some may sit in a wheelchair, and it’s important to treat others with kindness and consideration, no matter their differences.

By managing expectations and framing the movie in this light we were able to enjoy the film, and even have a follow-up conversation about the scene afterward. So all in all, I’m thankful for the teachable moments Peter Rabbit brought to our house.

- Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team  

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Smoothie Bars & Ice Cream Parlors: A Potential Allergy Nightmare

Standing in line at Trader Joe’s last week, I noticed a sign alerting shoppers of a recent recall of their Matcha Green Tea Ice Cream due to “the potential presence of small metal pieces in the product.” If you’re thinking, “That’s nuts!” You’re right—although in my case, either would probably be just as harmful (I’m fatally allergic to nuts). 

The idea that some small dangerous object could be hiding in your food is not a far-flung concept for the food-allergic. If you’ve never lived with a food allergy, or cared for someone with a food allergy, it’s hard to appreciate the dangers that lurk behind seemingly innocent foods. And they often hide in the most unsuspecting places. Two such places are ice cream parlors and smoothie bars—or what UCLA pediatric allergist Dr. Maria Garcia-Lloret refers to as “allergy minefields.”

If you’ve ever been to an ice cream parlor with a food allergy, you know that the only thing separating a scoop of almond praline swirl and plain vanilla is typically a bucket of water—and for someone with a severe food allergy, that’s not going to cut it. Trace amounts of a food allergen, as low as parts-per-million levels, can be fatal for those with a severe food allergy.

These days, many popular smoothie bars offer “protein boost” health supplements, which often include tree nut and peanut powders (or other popular plant-based powders like chia seed, brown rice, hemp seed, green pea, sunflower seed, or pumpkin). These powders can have incredibly high allergen concentrations, which is to say, the slightest trace of one of these powders can trigger a severe reaction.

Dr. Garcia-Lloret, a professor of pediatric allergy at the Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA and a pioneer in the food allergy community, has been treating food-allergic patients for nearly 20 years. Needless to say, she’s seen countless allergic reactions and anaphylactic episodes over the years. When we spoke, she offered a cautionary tale when it came to these cold summer treats. "Based on my experience, those with food allergies should be wary of ice cream parlors and smoothie bars, as they don't usually think of these types of establishments as hazardous, and they lower their guard." She also mentioned that teenagers are particularly vulnerable in these settings, noting how carefree summer outings with friends too often lead to the emergency room. 

That said, if you have a food allergy but still need your cold smoothie or ice cream fix (like me!), the most important thing you can do is know all of the ingredients present at the facility, and make sure you’re comfortable with the measures the facility takes to prevent cross-contact. Additionally, here are a few other tips:

1.     Ask the smoothie bar to use a freshly washed blender. Double-check their sanitizing process to ensure the blender has been thoroughly cleaned and there is no lingering allergen residue.

2.     Make sure the ice cream scoop has been thoroughly washed since its last use.

3.     If the person behind the counter wears gloves, ask them if they’d kindly change their gloves (or wash their hands if they’re not wearing gloves, as appropriate). Many of these establishments offer other foods as well, so this is a good way to ensure you’re avoiding cross-contact.

On the upside, many ice cream parlors and smoothie bars are becoming increasingly allergy-conscious, and are implementing more stringent protocols to accommodate those with severe food allergies. Let’s be honest, what kid (or adult) doesn’t want to participate in this classic summer pastime? If you’re now wondering, Where do I find hidden these allergy-friendly gems?! Spokin recently compiled this short list of some the nation’s most allergy-friendly ice cream parlors! Or, if you’d prefer to purchase a pint instead, check out this list of top allergy-friendly ice creams!

Wishing you all a SWEET summer!

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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