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Airborne Food Allergens—What’s the Risk?

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When we hear stories of serious allergic reactions to food, they often involve someone unknowingly ingesting a food that contains their allergen. Gut-wrenching stories like the grilled cheese that killed a NYC preschooler, the Indian takeout food fatality in England, the woman left paralyzed after ingesting peanuts while traveling in Budapest, and the sesame-related death of a teenage girl after eating a Prèt A Manger baguette at an airport. 

For many of us, these stories hit a bit too close to home.

In these cases, the food was ingested—but what happens when the allergen goes airborne?  

In January, a story about an 11-year-old New Jersey boy rocked headlines after he died from what authorities believe was an allergic reaction from breathing in the steam from fish cooking in the kitchen. 

While rare, allergic reactions to aerosolized allergens do occur. 

According to Dr. John Lee, Clinical Director of the Boston Children’s Food Allergy Program, most airborne reactions probably occur due to particles of protein that rise into the air when food is actively cooked, and then they’re inhaled. “I’ve had patients describe their throat itching while around peanuts, or reported mild reactions on airplanes, but most airborne reactions typically result from particles of protein rising off heated foods.” For example, he offers someone with a shellfish allergy walking into a seafood restaurant, or a wheat-allergic patient standing near boiling pasta.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, exposure to airborne food allergens does not typically result in anaphylaxis; however, these airborne particulates can cause symptoms such as itchy eyes, a runny nose, a cough, congestion, and difficulty breathing.

Airborne food particulates can also trigger two forms of occupational asthma: 1) baker’s asthma, following exposure to powdered allergen substances such as dried egg powder, soy flour, or wheat flour during baking; and 2) crab asthma, which is caused by dust and fume exposure from steaming, cooking, or scrubbing crab in processing plants. Both forms of asthma are considered allergic diseases because of the role allergenic proteins play in the respiratory response.

Notably, airborne allergic reactions aren’t limited to food. In at least one case, a chemical fragrance was the culprit. After a teenager named Brandon started developing headaches and hives at school, he connected his symptoms to Axe Body Spray. His allergy to the spray worsened, eventually leading to anaphylactic shock. Laws protecting manufacturers like Axe barred disclosure of the spray’s full ingredients list, preventing his family from discovering the allergenic trigger. Brandon had to leave school because of the exposure risks. 

Suffice it to say, airborne allergenic reactions extend beyond food. 

Most reported airborne reactions, however, continue to stem from common allergenic foods. Since peanut is the number one trigger of food-related anaphylaxis, the extent to which peanut particulates pose a risk is a common question in the food allergy community. 

In a 2003 study of 30 children with severe peanut allergies, researchers examined the extent to which inhalation and skin exposure elicited a reaction. For the skin test, one third of children experienced reddening or skin flares after peanut butter was pressed to their skin for one minute. Conversely, no child experienced respiratory symptoms after sitting in close proximity to three ounces of peanut butter for ten minutes.

The topic of aerosolized allergenic reactions has stirred enough controversy among food-allergic travelers that Southwest Airlines stopped serving peanuts on all flights starting in August 2018, and JetBlue does not serve peanuts on its aircrafts.

Food for thought? We think so. Have you experienced an airborne allergen causing an allergic reaction? Please share your experience if so! 

- Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

This piece was written by the Allergy Amulet team and reviewed by Allergy Amulet advisors Dr. John Lee and Dr. Jordan Scott. 

Dr. John Lee is the Clinical Director of the Food Allergy Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Lee is widely recognized for his work in food allergy, and his commitment to patient health. 

Dr. Scott is an allergist/immunologist and operates several private allergy clinics throughout the Boston area. He is on the board of overseers at Boston Children’s Hospital, and the past President of the Massachusetts Allergy and Asthma Society. 

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Intuitive Eating + Food Allergy

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Proper nutrition, much like medicine, does not have a one-size-fits-all approach. In fact, what works for one person may not work for another. This is also why fad diets often don’t work. 

One of the more recent nutrition concepts that extends into counseling practices is Intuitive Eating, which encourages us to steer away from the diet mentality, and instead embrace positive lifestyle behaviors. The authors and dietitians behind Intuitive Eating, Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch, first wrote about the concept in 1995, publishing what is today the best-known book for helping rebuild healthy body images and restoring normal healthy eating behaviors. 

When I hear diet talk from friends, family, and clients, I’m often conflicted. On the one hand, I applaud the perceived need to change. On the other hand, I know scientifically that diets don’t often work; behavior and lifestyle changes are what stick. There is an overwhelming body of scientific literature that offers insight as to why our bodies fight diets. So if diets don’t work, then how do we make healthier, long lasting, and positive lifestyle changes? Here’s where Intuitive Eating comes into play. 

I like to compare Intuitive Eating to your best self-care day—it’s listening exactly to what your body needs, accepting it, nourishing it, and moving on. It’s giving your body the nutrients it needs while listening to your internal cues. 

The following are the 10 main ideas behind Intuitive Eating: 

1.   Reject the diet mentality. Get rid of the ideas and materials (books, magazines, etc.) that encourage and offer false hope of quick weight loss. 

2.   Honor your hunger. Physically and biologically feed your body the adequate energy it needs to function properly. Build trust in yourself that your body will tell you exactly what it needs. 

3.   Make peace with food. Give yourself permission to eat and abolish food rules. No foods are forbidden (unless you have a food allergy, that is). More on that later!

4.   Challenge the food police. Don’t applaud yourself for only eating x number of calories or feel guilty for eating that piece of birthday cake. 

5.   Respect your fullness. Really listen to the body signals that tell you you’re full. 

6.   Discover the satisfaction factor. Savor the foods that bring you joy and pleasure. You’ll typically find you end up eating less of that “forbidden” food because you took the time to savor it. 

7.   Honor your feelings without using food. Stress, anxiety, and boredom are some of the feelings that are often responsible for triggering emotional eating. Instead, pay attention to your emotional responses. 

8.   Respect your body. Accept your genes. You would never force your feet into the wrong shoes. Give your body the respect it deserves. 

9.   Exercise. Focus on how you feel while working out. If you hate it, try something new. Look at the true motivation behind your workout—is it to lose weight? Feel an endorphin high? Reduce stress?

10.  Honor your health. Make food choices that honor your health, but that also make you feel good. You don’t have to have a perfect diet. Remember, it’s progress over time that matters, not any one meal or one day that will make the difference. 

Over time, I’ve grown curious as to how food allergies, intolerances, and other medical conditions might apply to a philosophy like Intuitive Eating, which challenges us to actively listen to our bodies’ dietary needs. Initially it seemed counterintuitive to combine the two: one teaches us that we should intuitively feed our body what it needs/wants, while the other requires us to avoid certain foods for medical purposes. 

But what if Intuitive Eating could unlock greater freedom, patience, and kindness towards their bodies for those with food allergies?

Intrigued? Let’s dig into the details. 

Diets don’t work for a variety of reasons. Scientifically, when you restrict food or are on a diet, your brain produces something called neuropeptide Y, which triggers your brain to crave carbohydrates. Familiar with that feeling you get at 11am because you skipped breakfast? Pay a little thank you to your brain. It’s physically reminding you that you haven’t eaten and that you need to feed it carbohydrates because they are our body’s primary and preferred source of energy. When the body is in a deficit, we are physically depriving it of the calories and nutrients it needs to function. 

This isn’t to say all diets are bad. In particular, medically-prescribed diets are often extremely helpful and medically necessary for those suffering from food allergies, intolerances, and other medical conditions. However, many diets end up depriving your body of the vital nutrients it needs to function properly. The more you deny your hunger and fight your natural biology, the stronger and more intense these food cravings can become. 

If you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you either suffer from a food allergy or intolerance, or care for someone who does. Food allergies force us to eliminate foods or food groups to keep us safe. Intuitive Eating encourages us to ditch all food-related rules. How do you reconcile the two? What about challenging the idea that food allergies are a limitation, and instead, thinking of your food allergy as part of your body’s intuition? By reframing the way you think about your food allergy, you acknowledge your food cravings and indulge in the foods that your body CAN tolerate. Craving ice cream but have a dairy allergy? Search out dairy-free ice cream alternatives—there are a lot of comparable ones out there that are delicious and will do the trick. This way you honor your cravings, while respecting your body’s intuitive dietary boundaries. 

If you’re curious to learn more about Intuitive Eating, here are a few resources:

1.     https://www.intuitiveeating.org

2.     10 principles explained in depth: https://www.intuitiveeating.org/10-principles-of-intuitive-eating/

3.    Additional resources: https://www.intuitiveeating.org/resources/articles/

Rebecca Noren is on the Allergy Amulet health advisory board and works with chef Ming Tsai. Rebecca holds a master's degree in nutrition and is a registered dietitian. She is dedicated to bringing her expertise in public relations, marketing, and culinary production to the intersection of food, health, and food allergies. 

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Humans Are Pooping Plastic

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Got your attention? Thought so. 😉

If you’re thinking, What does poop have to do with food allergies? First, food allergies affect our health and diet, which implicates our digestive tract. Number two, research is increasingly looking to the gut for answers around the rise in food allergies. For these reasons, we thought the topic was a-poo-priate. 💩

This past summer, Austrian researchers reported that the deluge of plastic entering our environment is now entering our stool. That’s right—plastic has been discovered in 114 aquatic species90% of seabirds, and now, evidently, in us. 

As part of this first-of-its-kind study, researchers followed eight volunteers from a handful of European countries, tracked their consumption habits, and then sampled their stool. Small fibers of plastic—known as microplastics—were found in all participants’ feces to varying degrees, amounting to the first documentation of plastic in human feces to date. The findings confirmed what many scientists have long suspected: we’re eating plastic.

Scientists are now grappling with the health implications, which are largely unknown. Microplastics are capable of damaging the reproductive and gastrointestinal systems in sea life, but little is known about their impact on humans.

On average, 13 billion microplastic particles enter US waterways every day through the municipal water supply. An estimated 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans each year. The latter bulk of plastic gets broken down into smaller bits, which are eaten by smaller organisms, and make their way up the food chain.

How does this relate to the food allergy and intolerance community? 

First, we know that immune health is closely tied to food allergies and intolerances. Experts have found that plastic in the gut can suppress the immune system and increase the likelihood of gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease. Second, research has shown that exposure to phthalates, which are found in many plastics, can increase childhood risk of allergies. According to the lead researcher of the study, Dr. Philipp Schwabi: “[my] primary concern is the human impact… especially [on] patients with gastrointestinal diseases.” He notes that “the smallest particles are capable of entering the bloodstream, the lymphatic system and may even reach the liver.”

While research on the human impact of plastic is still early, one thing is clear: plastic may be harming our immune systems, which could potentially implicate our body’s ability to tolerate and digest certain foods.

We’re eating our waste—that much is clear. Now the question is, what are we going to do about it? 

-      Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Ming Tsai’s Food For Thought

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My journey with food allergies began when I opened my first restaurant, Blue Ginger, in 1998. I felt it was important that our kitchen be mindful of food allergies to ensure that all customers could safely dine with us. Little did I know that soon enough food allergies would become an enormous part of my everyday life. 

Just a few years after opening Blue Ginger, my oldest son was diagnosed with multiple food allergies; in fact, he was born severely allergic to soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, shellfish, and eggs. At first, as a chef, I thought it was an unfunny joke from upstairs. But I soon realized it would be an invaluable lesson and opportunity. I quickly learned that trying to eat at restaurants with food allergies was a much larger task than I imagined. Even though I had established protocols in my restaurant for those with food allergies, most other restaurants didn’t take the same care. I can recall a few times where my family and I were turned away because the chef or restaurant did not want to accommodate us. There were a few occasions where my son was accidentally served a dish containing a small amount of one of his allergens, and within minutes he began exhibiting symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction. As a parent, it’s one the scariest experiences. Thankfully, my wife is a trained nurse, and we were able to spot the signs quickly and administer epinephrine right away. 

First implemented at Blue Ginger, and later at Blue Dragon (which is 100% peanut and tree nut free), we created a book that includes every dish on the menu and a comprehensive list of ingredients separated by dish components (i.e. proteins, starches, vegetables, sauces, and garnishes). This way, the patron and restaurant staff can easily determine which part of the dish has the allergen and omit the item from their order. For example, a customer with a peanut allergy would still be able to have the Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce by opting for an alternate (and equally delicious) dipping sauce. 

Additionally, any ingredient processed and received from outside vendors is starred and the ingredients are indexed in our system (e.g., dried *egg* pasta). A highlighted ingredient indicates that it is one of the top eight food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, shellfish, fish, milk, or egg. Our protocols also ensure proper lines of communication between the front of house staff and the kitchen. Every manager, server, and bartender is trained to ensure all customers can safely dine with us. You can find an example of our documentation here.

My family’s experiences, and the knowledge that comes with being a restaurant owner and chef, inspired me to champion the first bill in Massachusetts to require all local restaurants to comply with food allergy awareness guidelines. It took four years working with the Massachusetts legislature to write Bill S. 2701, which was eventually signed into law in early 2009.  

I’m incredibly proud of the work that we’ve done in Massachusetts to help those with food allergies have a more positive restaurant experience. As a chef, restaurateur, and a food allergy parent, I’ve experienced this issue from multiple sides. From the customer perspective, it’s important to notify the restaurant when making the reservation, triple-check that the server understands the severity of the allergy, and do a final check when the food arrives at the table for any visible cross-contact with your allergen or mistakes. Food allergies are a two-way street. From the restaurant perspective, we need to have procedures in place to make sure customers can safely eat, but we also need to be made aware of any allergies and understand the severity so that we can accommodate. Over the years, I’ve developed a useful and effective way to better determine the severity of people’s food allergies. I ask, “Is using the same fryer okay?” The point we are getting at here is if shrimp is fried in a fryer, could the customer eat fries out of that same fryer? Depending on the answer we then have a better understanding as to the severity of the food allergy, which we use as a directive to the kitchen staff. 

Restaurants should care about food allergies not only because it keeps their patrons safe, but also because it’s smart business. The hospitality industry can be challenging, and meeting customer’s demands is always of the utmost importance. At the end of the day, we are all fighting for loyal customers. 

I guarantee you, if you serve a food allergy customer a delicious and safe meal, and they leave smiling, you’ll have a customer for life.

Peace and Good Eating, 

Chef Ming Tsai

 

Ming Tsai holds an equity stake in Allergy Amulet.

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The 411 on the 504: School Allergy Plans Decoded

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Last month we covered the basics of kids and epinephrine. This month we’re bringing you the skinny on school management plans for your child’s food allergies.

Are you wondering about a 504? An IEP? Have we lost you? 

Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. 

Setting Up the Plan

Most school districts have district-wide plans for food allergy management, treatment, and reaction prevention. Many states also offer suggestions for school districts on managing food allergies based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, there is no federal regulation that standardizes these policies and procedures, so these policies vary between states (and often between school districts within each state). 

The first step in setting up an allergy management plan for your child is to reach out to your child’s school. Many schools will ask you and your child’s doctor to fill out an allergy and anaphylaxis emergency plan form, although this form can go by different names. This form covers what steps school staff should take in case the child is exposed to an allergen or if he/she exhibits symptoms of a reaction. The American Academy of Pediatrics published this template form for reference. Once submitted, the school nurse typically prepares an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP): an internal document that outlines the processes the school should follow in the event the child experiences an allergic reaction. 

Some parents go one step further and request a 504 plan. Section 504 is part of a federal civil rights law that protects individuals with disabilities and health conditions, including life-threatening food allergies. The law applies to all schools and programs that receive financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education (so all public schools and some private schools). A 504 plan lays out how the school should prevent and respond to allergic events. If a 504 plan protocol is not followed, there are several dispute resolution options available for parents. 

To secure a 504 plan, a parent must contact the school district’s 504 coordinator, who works with school officials to determine if the child qualifies. This determination is based in part on medical history, so your doctor may need to provide the school with this information. If the child qualifies, the team will work together to determine what special accommodations and protocols must be followed. 

Notably, if your child has a disability and qualifies for an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a separate 504 plan is not necessary. The child’s food allergy accommodations may be joined under their IEP. Also of note, in some non-religious private schools where 504 plans do not apply, parents may rely on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to ensure that the school implements a food allergy management plan for the child. 

School Policy Options

Since there are no national standards for food allergy protocols, policies vary widely between schools. 

According to a recent study surveying school nurses across the country, the most frequently reported policies include: training school staff to respond to allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, using epinephrine autoinjectors, and managing for cross-contact in cafeterias. Other policies commonly implemented include: community food allergy awareness events, designated lunch areas for children with food allergies, and food guidelines for classroom celebrations.

The least frequently reported policies were: allergen labeling information in cafeterias, food management policies for after-school activities, and school-provided stock epinephrine for field trips and off-campus outings. In light of the differences between school policies, parents should understand their school’s protocols before developing their child’s plan.

Words of Wisdom

Finally, we talked with a few food allergy parents in different school districts and asked them to share a few words of wisdom on these management plans:

- “Plans may be different within the same school system—as your child goes from elementary to middle to high school, you will want to revisit your plan. For example, once a child moves to a different school building, new protocols may be appropriate. Older children may also be allowed to self-carry epinephrine or antihistamines.”

- “Make sure your plan or school policies cover transportation to and from school if your child rides the school bus.”

- “Think about after-school plans for your older child, as middle and high school students often have plans with friends after school. For example: can they store their medicine in a school locker during the day–even if the school doesn’t allow self-carry–so that they are prepared to go to a friend’s house or activity directly after?”

We hope this rundown of plan options, food allergy management policies, and parenting wisdom helps you to better advocate for your child’s food allergy needs!

-      Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Spokin’s Susie Hultquist: A Fearless Food Allergy Mama!

Susie and her food-allergic daughter, Natalie.

Susie and her food-allergic daughter, Natalie.

If you’ve followed Allergy Amulet for a while, you know our team was founded by a female and that we love to support female entrepreneurs!

Unsurprisingly, we’re big fans of Susie Hultquist and the team she’s assembled at Spokin. This Chi-town team has built an app to help make managing food allergies easier! We recently sat down with Susie and asked her a few questions.

1. We understand you left your financial career on Wall Street to start Spokin. When did the “light bulb” moment happen?

It happened when my co-worker was selling girl scout cookies. I wanted to buy some, but in order to do that, I had to get ahold of a package to check the label and ensure they were safe for my family. I then went to their website to make sure the cookies were also available in our area. It took me 15 minutes to track down all the information I needed! That’s when I realized I was probably not the only person managing food allergies searching for this same information, and that there was a clear need to streamline and consolidate food safety information for the food allergy community.

At the time I was managing my company’s consumer internet portfolio and saw how different businesses were managing pain points. No one was solving this one, and I felt I was uniquely positioned to do so.

2. How long did it take to launch the app? 

It was two years in the making. I started by meeting with a lot of people who have food allergies. From there, we developed a content strategy and hired a graphic designer to work on app designs. We just celebrated the app’s first birthday!

3. What is your “why”?

My daughter Natalie. She’s allergic to peanuts and several tree nuts. I am determined to make her life easier and to help her live the fullest life possible. That’s what gets me up every day. 

A food allergy diagnosis often comes with a lot of no’s when it comes to food, and I want to be able to say yes as often as I can!

4. Spokin has a lot of new features and capabilities on the app. What are you most excited about?

Far and away is the map functionality! If you’re in the app and search within the “eateries” category you can choose any city in the US and see in seconds all the restaurants, bakeries, and ice cream shops others in the Spokin community have recommended. We now have 2.7 million reviews on the app and reviews span across 18 countries! 

To find in seconds all these yes’s after so many no’s is amazing. And it’s built by the food allergy community! This community is so generous. 

5. What does Spokin mean?

It’s a play on the word spoken. I had so many amazing interactions with people in the food allergy community that gave me advice verbally (where to eat in London, what chocolate chips to bake with, what to take with us on an airplane, etc.) but once spoken, that advice then vanished into thin air. All of this knowledge needed to be captured and shared with everyone. The idea was that if we built this platform, we could harness and share all of this great food wisdom with the food allergy community at large. 

6. When do you plan to release the Android version of the app?

We have started an Android waiting list and it’s on our product roadmap. We’re currently assessing demand, so please add your email to the Android list on our website, if interested! 

7. When you’re not focused on helping the food allergy community, what do you enjoy doing?

Spending time with my girls and my husband! We love to cook together, run together, and travel when we can. My girls all have very different interests so it’s fun to watch them pursue their passions. 

8. Since Spokin is based in Chicago, we have to know: do you cheer for the White Sox or the Cubs?

I love the Cubs, but I applaud the White Sox for offering peanut-free ballgames!

9. What’s your long-term vision for Spokin?

If everyone in the US with food allergies shared five recommendations we could build a database of 75 million data points that everyone can access! We’ve estimated that if it takes you 15 minutes a day to manage food allergies, then you can save a year of your life by having all of this information accessible to you. 

If you haven’t downloaded the Spokin app we recommend you check it out ASAP! Both Susie (Susie in the Spokin app) and Allergy Amulet’s founder, Abi Barnes, (allergy_amulet_abi in the Spokin app) have provided lots of recommendations!

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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FOMO: Fear of Missing Out… On Nutrients

Part II: Wheat, Soy, Peanuts, and Tree Nuts

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Welcome to Part II of our FOMO series! Here we’re discussing how to replace nutrients lost from eliminating wheat, soy, peanuts, or tree nuts from your diet. You can find Part I here covering dairy, eggs, fish, and shellfish.

If you’re used to eating toast, cereal, pancakes, or other baked goods for breakfast, avoiding foods that contain wheat will likely be a hard adjustment. Or maybe you fed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to your first child with no issue and your second child cannot eat peanut butter. It is an adjustment, to say the least! 

As a pediatric nutritionist, my work focuses on making sure kids with special dietary needs are getting the nutrients their growing bodies need. As you can imagine, many of my patients have multiple food allergies and have a fairly limited diet. The silver lining for these patients is that these children tend to have healthier diets because they’re avoiding lots of processed foods! 

I like to start by looking at each food that’s avoided and its corresponding nutrients side by side. As we discussed in Part I, this approach can make it less intimidating to identify other food sources for those lost nutrients.  

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Let’s take a closer look at a few of the nutrients needed when avoiding wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts.

Wheat products in America are fortified with B vitamins, thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin. 

Thiamin is important for maintaining a healthy metabolism and key function of cells. The major thiamin food sources are whole grains, meat, and fish. In the US, breads, cereals, and infant formulas are enriched with thiamin as well as other B vitamins. If you’re avoiding wheat and most breads and cereals, you may want to ensure your wheat-free products are enriched with these key nutrients as well!

Niacin is another B vitamin—B3 to be specific. Niacin helps our bodies use fat, protein, and carbohydrates to create energy. This vitamin is also enriched in processed wheat products and can be found naturally in most meats as well as mushrooms, avocados, and sunflower seeds, to name a few. 

If you’re a meat eater and wheat-avoider, I’m not typically concerned that you’re missing out on B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin) or iron. However, you may want to think about how much fiber is in your diet. Many people substitute rice, potatoes, and corn-based products for wheat. However, these are mostly low in fiber.

Fiber is a carbohydrate that your body does not digest. There are two types of fiber: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and helps to regulate blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and works to move food through the digestive tract. Many people experience symptoms like constipation after making a change in their diet. In these cases, I tell my patients to increase their fiber intake and add fruits, vegetables, legumes, brown rice, and other whole grains like oatmeal and quinoa. 

If you are not a meat eater, and you’ve eliminated wheat or soy, this next one is for you.

Iron is found in red meat, fish, and poultry, but there are many plant-based sources of iron outside of wheat and soy, including spinach, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds (e.g., pumpkin, chia, sunflower, and hemp), dried fruits, quinoa, and some fortified breakfast cereals. Iron is better absorbed with vitamin C, so I recommend adding an orange alongside your trail mix for your next snack. Calcium inhibits iron absorption, so whether you get your calcium from dairy or a dairy substitute, try to avoid eating them together. 

Avoiding soy is not easy because it is in so many foods. Both peanuts and soy belong to the legume family and contain many of the same nutrients such as B vitamins, protein, magnesium, and phosphorus. 

Magnesium helps normalize blood pressure and keeps our bones strong. Phosphorus also helps to keep our bones strong and helps our bodies make energy and move our muscles. Both of these minerals are found in abundance in beans, seeds, and tree nuts. Phosphorus is also found in dairy, eggs, in meat products, whole grains, potatoes, and dried fruit.

The goal for everyone should be to expand their diet and add more variety! A more diverse diet will lead to greater nutrient intake, and hopefully more delicious meals. If you feel like you’re in a food rut, take a chance and add something new to your routine. Your body (and likely your taste buds) will thank you!   

 

Tara McCarthy is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who has a passion for pediatrics. She has worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for over 15 years as well as a private practice and specializes in nutrition for children with special dietary needs such as food allergies, celiac disease, FPIES, EoE, allergic colitis, and sucrose isomaltose deficiency. 

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FOMO: Fear of Missing Out… On Nutrients

Part I: Milk, Eggs, Fish, and Shellfish

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FOMO, or the fear of missing out, is a source of anxiety for many. For some, it means missing out on social engagements with friends. For others (likely many of our Allergy Amulet followers), it means missing out on certain foods. If you’re in the latter category, this post is for you.

There are many reasons people avoid certain foods: elimination diets, food allergies, or food intolerances, to name a few. In these cases, you’re not only removing the food from your diet, you’re also removing important nutrients (especially if we are talking about growing children!). As a pediatric dietitian, my job is to identify the foods that need to be eliminated, and then figure out how to ensure those lost nutrients remain in my client's diet.

This two-part series will focus on the nutrient implications of eliminating one or more of the top eight most common food allergens from your diet. Whether because of a food allergy or intolerance, or for diet or religious reasons, we’ve got you covered. This first part will focus on milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish. Next month, we’ll cover wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts. Let’s get started.

Personally, I find it helpful to first look at each food and its corresponding nutrients side by side. This approach can make it less intimidating to then find other food sources for those lost nutrients.

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As you can see, some of the foods listed above have overlapping nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. For example, if you are eliminating eggs from your diet, you can find substitutes for protein and vitamin B12 in fish and shellfish.

Where can you find these nutrients and how do they affect your health? Let’s take a closer look.

Protein: Is my child getting enough protein? This question comes up frequently in my practice. First, it’s important to keep in mind that the majority of Americans eat plenty of protein! To see how much daily protein you should be consuming, these Dietary Reference Intake standards provide helpful guidelines. On average, a child should consume approximately .8 - 1.2 gram/kg of protein per day, depending on their age. For example, a 4-year-old child who weighs 35 pounds would need about 16 grams of protein per day. For perspective, a glass of soy milk at breakfast and a turkey sandwich at lunch would be about 24 grams.  

Of course, protein doesn’t just come from animals. There are many plant-based sources that can help you meet your daily protein needs. Most non-dairy milks and yogurts are rich in plant-based protein, for example, as well as beans, legumes, seeds, and nuts.

Has anyone noticed the ever-growing number of milk substitutes hitting grocery aisles? I certainly have! If you’re wondering which one might be best for you, the below table shows common milk substitutes and their approximate nutritional values.

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Calcium: Most parents worry about protein, but I find I’m more focused on calcium intake - especially for those that don’t eat dairy! Calcium is important because it helps maintain the strength of our bones and teeth. It also supports our body structure and helps our muscles, heart, and nervous system function properly. Calcium can be found in vegetables like bok choy, broccoli, Chinese cabbage and collards, beans (black, garbanzo, pinto), and almonds. Several milk substitutes and some orange juices and cereals are also fortified with calcium. Calcium needs range from 700mg - 1300mg/day, depending on a person’s age.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D also plays a role in bone health and the absorption of calcium. Your vitamin D intake depends mostly on sunlight exposure. That said, if you’re not getting much sunlight (read: grey winter weather), it helps to supplement your diet with this important nutrient. You may also routinely have your blood checked to determine whether you’re deficient in this vitamin, as you may need more than the recommended daily dose. If you can’t eat dairy or eggs (a major source of vitamin D), you should look to foods enriched with vitamin D as substitutes.

B Vitamins (B12, B2/Riboflavin, and B5/Pantothenic acid): B vitamins are important multitaskers. They are involved in everything from cognitive function and mood, to energy production and heart health.

B12: The best sources of vitamin B12 are eggs, milk, meat, fish, and poultry. I most often worry about B12 intake in my patients that are vegetarian or vegan. If you fall in either of those camps, plant-based milk substitutes and fortified beverages are great ways to help you meet your daily B12 needs while avoiding animal products.

B2/Riboflavin: Foods high in riboflavin include eggs, dairy, lean meats, green vegetables, and fortified grains (think cereals and breads).

B5/Pantothenic acid: Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid in scientific terms) plays an important role in turning carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy. It removes strain, or stress on the body. Good sources of B5 include mushrooms, cheese, fish, avocados, eggs, lean meats, sunflower seeds, and sweet potatoes.

Expert tip: focus on the foods that you CAN eat. If certain foods are off limits, create a list of the foods you can safely eat, and separate them into different categories (see below).

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Ultimately, the more variety in your diet, the more likely you are to meet your nutritional needs. Plus, it makes eating that much more interesting! Nobody should have FOMO when it comes to food—even if cutting out certain foods is a necessary part of your diet. The solution, in my opinion, is expanding your palate.

 

Tara McCarthy is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who has a passion for pediatrics. She has worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for over 15 years as well as a private practice, and specializes in nutrition for children with special dietary needs such as food allergies, celiac disease, FPIES, EoE, allergic colitis, and sucrose isomaltose deficiency. 

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The Secret is Out: Transparency is In

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Last fall, Kellogg’s acquired a protein bar startup called RXBAR for $600M dollars. The significance of that deal is twofold. First is the story behind the company: two childhood friends built the business out of their kitchen with $5,000 each and no outside funding. Second, their brand was built on transparency and candor: each bar neatly lists a handful of ingredients on the front packaging followed by their signature motto: “No B.S.”

The market took notice.

In an era where food labels list hard-to-pronounce ingredients like “tartrazine” and “disodium inosinate” and include vague statements like “may contain” (which we wrote a separate blog post about), consumers are unsurprisingly gravitating towards products like RXBAR.

But the trend isn’t limited to food. Increasingly, shoppers are looking to company values—including a company’s commitment to transparency—when making purchase decisions. More consumers are looking beyond price tag and factoring in product origin, reputation, and quality and ethical standards. The rise of fair trade, organic, and Certified B Corporations (“B Corps”) is a testament to shifting consumer preferences. Consumers are also looking at where companies donate politically: with a new app from startup Goods Unite Us, consumers can run political background checks on products to see what political party their purchase indirectly supports.

Corporate candor is a hot commodity right now. That much is clear.

A Label Insight study looking at consumer behavior around food and personal care products found that nearly 40% of consumers would switch from their preferred brand to one that offered more product transparency. A quarter of respondents indicated that transparency was the leading reason they remained loyal to brands.

We live in a digital age where consumers have access to unprecedented levels of information. In turn, they are using that information to scrutinize company decision-making and hold companies accountable for those decisions. The businesses that are quickest to adapt will likely outperform and outlive their peers.

Investors see the appeal.

Investors routinely evaluate the risk of any potential deal or transaction. Transparency helps mitigate these risks by identifying blind spots, which can in turn reduce reputational, compliance, and financial risk. Transparency also fosters trust: the foundation of any business relationship.

The metrics of business success do not always account for intangibles like transparency and trust—but they should. Facebook is learning that the hard way this month, as user numbers drop and #DeleteFacebook becomes a trending hashtag.

Trust is hard to earn, difficult to quantify, and easily lost. For these reasons, trust is arguably the most valuable commodity a company holds. The precursor to trust is transparency.

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Invest In Women

Female leadership at Allergy Amulet from left to right: Susannah Gustafson (VP of Operations), Abi Barnes (CEO), and Meg Nohe (CMO).

Female leadership at Allergy Amulet from left to right: Susannah Gustafson (VP of Operations), Abi Barnes (CEO), and Meg Nohe (CMO).

While the Chinese zodiac sign for 2018 is the dog, a more appropriate symbol for this year is the woman.

Across the US, women are running for office in record numbers. France announced that it will begin imposing fines on companies that fail to eliminate unjustified gender pay gaps within the next three years. And in the US, movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp have forced our nation to address gender inequality, misogyny, and harassment.

One area where the gender disparity is particularly stark is the startup and venture capital space. In 2017, only 2% of all venture capital was invested in women-led startups, even though women own nearly 40% of the nation's businesses. That same year, the average financing round for women-led companies was less than half that of their male counterparts.

Why the glaring gender gap? While there’s no clear answer, many blame “mirrorocracy”: the idea that the VC community, lacking in diversity, tends to invest in individuals that look like them. Indeed, only ~8% of partners at the top 100 VC firms are women. A recent Harvard study further revealed bias in the line of questioning venture capitalists pose to female and male entrepreneurs. The study found that women were generally asked about the potential for losses, or what the study called “prevention” questions, whereas men were asked about the potential for gains, or “promotion” questions. For every additional prevention question posed to an entrepreneur, the startup raised an average $3.8M less.

Looking back at our own company’s fundraising trajectory, these figures are unsurprising. It took Allergy Amulet nearly three years to secure its first investment: a convertible note in 2016. And the vast majority of our current investors are men.

There’s a strong business case for investing in women. According to Credit Suisse, companies with female CEOs generate a 19% higher return on equity and a 10% higher dividend payout. A study by the Peterson Institute for International Economics found that companies with women in at least 33% of senior management roles accounted for higher annualized stock returns. The study also found that Fortune 500 companies with the greatest proportion of female board members significantly outperformed those with the lowest proportion.

We need to invest more in women, and we need more women investors.

Several VC firms are proactively seeking to address the problem. In a two-part series, Forbes identified several investors and VC funds committed to bridging the gender gap either by ensuring female representation among their partners, portfolio companies, or both.

As with any ecosystem, diversity breeds strength. The startup and venture capital worlds are no exception.  

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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