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FOMO: Fear of Missing Out… On Nutrients

Part II: Wheat, Soy, Peanuts, and Tree Nuts

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Welcome to Part II of our FOMO series! Here we’re discussing how to replace nutrients lost from eliminating wheat, soy, peanuts, or tree nuts from your diet. You can find Part I here covering dairy, eggs, fish, and shellfish.

If you’re used to eating toast, cereal, pancakes, or other baked goods for breakfast, avoiding foods that contain wheat will likely be a hard adjustment. Or maybe you fed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to your first child with no issue and your second child cannot eat peanut butter. It is an adjustment, to say the least! 

As a pediatric nutritionist, my work focuses on making sure kids with special dietary needs are getting the nutrients their growing bodies need. As you can imagine, many of my patients have multiple food allergies and have a fairly limited diet. The silver lining for these patients is that these children tend to have healthier diets because they’re avoiding lots of processed foods! 

I like to start by looking at each food that’s avoided and its corresponding nutrients side by side. As we discussed in Part I, this approach can make it less intimidating to identify other food sources for those lost nutrients.  

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Let’s take a closer look at a few of the nutrients needed when avoiding wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts.

Wheat products in America are fortified with B vitamins, thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin. 

Thiamin is important for maintaining a healthy metabolism and key function of cells. The major thiamin food sources are whole grains, meat, and fish. In the US, breads, cereals, and infant formulas are enriched with thiamin as well as other B vitamins. If you’re avoiding wheat and most breads and cereals, you may want to ensure your wheat-free products are enriched with these key nutrients as well!

Niacin is another B vitamin—B3 to be specific. Niacin helps our bodies use fat, protein, and carbohydrates to create energy. This vitamin is also enriched in processed wheat products and can be found naturally in most meats as well as mushrooms, avocados, and sunflower seeds, to name a few. 

If you’re a meat eater and wheat-avoider, I’m not typically concerned that you’re missing out on B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin) or iron. However, you may want to think about how much fiber is in your diet. Many people substitute rice, potatoes, and corn-based products for wheat. However, these are mostly low in fiber.

Fiber is a carbohydrate that your body does not digest. There are two types of fiber: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and helps to regulate blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and works to move food through the digestive tract. Many people experience symptoms like constipation after making a change in their diet. In these cases, I tell my patients to increase their fiber intake and add fruits, vegetables, legumes, brown rice, and other whole grains like oatmeal and quinoa. 

If you are not a meat eater, and you’ve eliminated wheat or soy, this next one is for you.

Iron is found in red meat, fish, and poultry, but there are many plant-based sources of iron outside of wheat and soy, including spinach, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds (e.g., pumpkin, chia, sunflower, and hemp), dried fruits, quinoa, and some fortified breakfast cereals. Iron is better absorbed with vitamin C, so I recommend adding an orange alongside your trail mix for your next snack. Calcium inhibits iron absorption, so whether you get your calcium from dairy or a dairy substitute, try to avoid eating them together. 

Avoiding soy is not easy because it is in so many foods. Both peanuts and soy belong to the legume family and contain many of the same nutrients such as B vitamins, protein, magnesium, and phosphorus. 

Magnesium helps normalize blood pressure and keeps our bones strong. Phosphorus also helps to keep our bones strong and helps our bodies make energy and move our muscles. Both of these minerals are found in abundance in beans, seeds, and tree nuts. Phosphorus is also found in dairy, eggs, in meat products, whole grains, potatoes, and dried fruit.

The goal for everyone should be to expand their diet and add more variety! A more diverse diet will lead to greater nutrient intake, and hopefully more delicious meals. If you feel like you’re in a food rut, take a chance and add something new to your routine. Your body (and likely your taste buds) will thank you!   

 

Tara McCarthy is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who has a passion for pediatrics. She has worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for over 15 years as well as a private practice and specializes in nutrition for children with special dietary needs such as food allergies, celiac disease, FPIES, EoE, allergic colitis, and sucrose isomaltose deficiency. 

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FOMO: Fear of Missing Out… On Nutrients

Part I: Milk, Eggs, Fish, and Shellfish

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FOMO, or the fear of missing out, is a source of anxiety for many. For some, it means missing out on social engagements with friends. For others (likely many of our Allergy Amulet followers), it means missing out on certain foods. If you’re in the latter category, this post is for you.

There are many reasons people avoid certain foods: elimination diets, food allergies, or food intolerances, to name a few. In these cases, you’re not only removing the food from your diet, you’re also removing important nutrients (especially if we are talking about growing children!). As a pediatric dietitian, my job is to identify the foods that need to be eliminated, and then figure out how to ensure those lost nutrients remain in my client's diet.

This two-part series will focus on the nutrient implications of eliminating one or more of the top eight most common food allergens from your diet. Whether because of a food allergy or intolerance, or for diet or religious reasons, we’ve got you covered. This first part will focus on milk, eggs, fish, and shellfish. Next month, we’ll cover wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts. Let’s get started.

Personally, I find it helpful to first look at each food and its corresponding nutrients side by side. This approach can make it less intimidating to then find other food sources for those lost nutrients.

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As you can see, some of the foods listed above have overlapping nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. For example, if you are eliminating eggs from your diet, you can find substitutes for protein and vitamin B12 in fish and shellfish.

Where can you find these nutrients and how do they affect your health? Let’s take a closer look.

Protein: Is my child getting enough protein? This question comes up frequently in my practice. First, it’s important to keep in mind that the majority of Americans eat plenty of protein! To see how much daily protein you should be consuming, these Dietary Reference Intake standards provide helpful guidelines. On average, a child should consume approximately .8 - 1.2 gram/kg of protein per day, depending on their age. For example, a 4-year-old child who weighs 35 pounds would need about 16 grams of protein per day. For perspective, a glass of soy milk at breakfast and a turkey sandwich at lunch would be about 24 grams.  

Of course, protein doesn’t just come from animals. There are many plant-based sources that can help you meet your daily protein needs. Most non-dairy milks and yogurts are rich in plant-based protein, for example, as well as beans, legumes, seeds, and nuts.

Has anyone noticed the ever-growing number of milk substitutes hitting grocery aisles? I certainly have! If you’re wondering which one might be best for you, the below table shows common milk substitutes and their approximate nutritional values.

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Calcium: Most parents worry about protein, but I find I’m more focused on calcium intake - especially for those that don’t eat dairy! Calcium is important because it helps maintain the strength of our bones and teeth. It also supports our body structure and helps our muscles, heart, and nervous system function properly. Calcium can be found in vegetables like bok choy, broccoli, Chinese cabbage and collards, beans (black, garbanzo, pinto), and almonds. Several milk substitutes and some orange juices and cereals are also fortified with calcium. Calcium needs range from 700mg - 1300mg/day, depending on a person’s age.

Vitamin D: Vitamin D also plays a role in bone health and the absorption of calcium. Your vitamin D intake depends mostly on sunlight exposure. That said, if you’re not getting much sunlight (read: grey winter weather), it helps to supplement your diet with this important nutrient. You may also routinely have your blood checked to determine whether you’re deficient in this vitamin, as you may need more than the recommended daily dose. If you can’t eat dairy or eggs (a major source of vitamin D), you should look to foods enriched with vitamin D as substitutes.

B Vitamins (B12, B2/Riboflavin, and B5/Pantothenic acid): B vitamins are important multitaskers. They are involved in everything from cognitive function and mood, to energy production and heart health.

B12: The best sources of vitamin B12 are eggs, milk, meat, fish, and poultry. I most often worry about B12 intake in my patients that are vegetarian or vegan. If you fall in either of those camps, plant-based milk substitutes and fortified beverages are great ways to help you meet your daily B12 needs while avoiding animal products.

B2/Riboflavin: Foods high in riboflavin include eggs, dairy, lean meats, green vegetables, and fortified grains (think cereals and breads).

B5/Pantothenic acid: Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid in scientific terms) plays an important role in turning carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy. It removes strain, or stress on the body. Good sources of B5 include mushrooms, cheese, fish, avocados, eggs, lean meats, sunflower seeds, and sweet potatoes.

Expert tip: focus on the foods that you CAN eat. If certain foods are off limits, create a list of the foods you can safely eat, and separate them into different categories (see below).

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Ultimately, the more variety in your diet, the more likely you are to meet your nutritional needs. Plus, it makes eating that much more interesting! Nobody should have FOMO when it comes to food—even if cutting out certain foods is a necessary part of your diet. The solution, in my opinion, is expanding your palate.

 

Tara McCarthy is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who has a passion for pediatrics. She has worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for over 15 years as well as a private practice, and specializes in nutrition for children with special dietary needs such as food allergies, celiac disease, FPIES, EoE, allergic colitis, and sucrose isomaltose deficiency. 

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Invest In Women

Female leadership at Allergy Amulet from left to right: Susannah Gustafson (VP of Operations), Abi Barnes (CEO), and Meg Nohe (CMO).

Female leadership at Allergy Amulet from left to right: Susannah Gustafson (VP of Operations), Abi Barnes (CEO), and Meg Nohe (CMO).

While the Chinese zodiac sign for 2018 is the dog, a more appropriate symbol for this year is the woman.

Across the US, women are running for office in record numbers. France announced that it will begin imposing fines on companies that fail to eliminate unjustified gender pay gaps within the next three years. And in the US, movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp have forced our nation to address gender inequality, misogyny, and harassment.

One area where the gender disparity is particularly stark is the startup and venture capital space. In 2017, only 2% of all venture capital was invested in women-led startups, even though women own nearly 40% of the nation's businesses. That same year, the average financing round for women-led companies was less than half that of their male counterparts.

Why the glaring gender gap? While there’s no clear answer, many blame “mirrorocracy”: the idea that the VC community, lacking in diversity, tends to invest in individuals that look like them. Indeed, only ~8% of partners at the top 100 VC firms are women. A recent Harvard study further revealed bias in the line of questioning venture capitalists pose to female and male entrepreneurs. The study found that women were generally asked about the potential for losses, or what the study called “prevention” questions, whereas men were asked about the potential for gains, or “promotion” questions. For every additional prevention question posed to an entrepreneur, the startup raised an average $3.8M less.

Looking back at our own company’s fundraising trajectory, these figures are unsurprising. It took Allergy Amulet nearly three years to secure its first investment: a convertible note in 2016. And the vast majority of our current investors are men.

There’s a strong business case for investing in women. According to Credit Suisse, companies with female CEOs generate a 19% higher return on equity and a 10% higher dividend payout. A study by the Peterson Institute for International Economics found that companies with women in at least 33% of senior management roles accounted for higher annualized stock returns. The study also found that Fortune 500 companies with the greatest proportion of female board members significantly outperformed those with the lowest proportion.

We need to invest more in women, and we need more women investors.

Several VC firms are proactively seeking to address the problem. In a two-part series, Forbes identified several investors and VC funds committed to bridging the gender gap either by ensuring female representation among their partners, portfolio companies, or both.

As with any ecosystem, diversity breeds strength. The startup and venture capital worlds are no exception.  

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Get Your Geek On: The Science Behind Food Allergy Testing

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Food testing is serious business. It’s also a large and growing one: the market for food testing kits was valued at $1.58 billion in 2016. That figure is expected to climb to $2.38 billion by 2022.

Since the enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) of 2011, food manufacturers are increasingly implementing comprehensive food testing procedures. Allergen testing has accordingly taken on a more prominent role in food safety plans. Traditionally, food allergen testing has been confined to the lab; but as new technologies emerge, and old technologies evolve, that’s starting to change.

In this post, we break down the most common food allergen detection technologies. We also discuss emerging technologies and approaches (including ours!) and why changes in food allergen detection are on the horizon. Spoiler alert: prepare for some major geeking out!

Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS)

As its name implies, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a two-phase test. During the liquid chromatography phase, a food sample is dissolved in a liquid and funneled through a highly-pressurized chromatography column, which separates molecules based on size and structure.

The mass spectrometer measures the mass of each molecule, as well as the masses of any molecular fragments. A molecule’s mass and fragmentation pattern provide identifying information about the molecule.

Caffeine: Mass Spectrum

Mass spectrum fingerprint of caffeine.

Mass spectrum fingerprint of caffeine.

Although LC-MS is a highly-selective tool for molecular identification, LC-MS instruments are expensive and large. Even modest instruments can cost tens of thousands of dollars and stand as high and wide as a microwave. Higher-end instruments can be as large as a car! Test times are also relatively long, ranging from 10 to 30 minutes per food sample. Accordingly, these tests are generally confined to lab environments at present.

Ultraviolet, Visible Light, Infrared, and Raman Spectroscopy

These spectroscopic methods rely on light absorption. A molecule’s chemical structure determines which light wavelengths may be absorbed and the degree of absorption. Spectrometers shine a range of wavelengths at a food sample, and a molecule’s relative absorption of those different wavelengths generates an identifying “fingerprint” for that molecule. You can think of spectroscopy as the enLIGHTened approach to molecular detection 😉.

Caffeine: Infrared Spectrum

Infrared   spectral fingerprint for caffeine. Peaks and dips signify   degree     of molecular light absorption.

Infrared spectral fingerprint for caffeine. Peaks and dips signify degree of molecular light absorption.

Spectral fingerprints are ideal for identifying molecules in samples containing only a few ingredients. Spectra can be generated in a span of seconds, with high-resolution versions taking only one to two minutes. However, identifying molecules in complex mixtures like food samples can present serious challenges for spectroscopic methods, as spectral fingerprints are likely to overlap, making individual molecules difficult or impossible to identify—especially in low quantities. Accordingly, spectroscopy does not currently lend itself to allergen detection in food samples. Moreover, any spectrometer that could potentially afford sufficient selectivity for allergen detection would be large and costly.

Immunoassays & ELISA

Immunoassay tests rely on antibodies. Antibodies are naturally-occurring proteins in the body’s immune system designed to recognize and fight potentially harmful foreign materials. Each antibody is formed to recognize a specific target—usually a protein or protein fragment. Since the 1950’s, scientists have cultivated antibodies to function outside of the body. These antibodies led to tests known as immunoassays. There are many variants of immunoassays, including ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) tests, which many food manufacturers use to test for allergens during the manufacturing process.

In a typical immunoassay, a liquid sample suspected of containing a particular allergenic protein is exposed to a test strip containing antibodies, which are formulated to recognize that specific protein. If the target protein is present, the protein will stick to the antibodies on the test strip and a secondary reaction will stain the bound protein, causing the test strip to change color.

Immunoassays are highly selective, portable, and can produce results in as little as a few minutes. However, culturing and harvesting specific antibodies can be expensive. Moreover, antibodies—like most proteins—are sensitive to harsh conditions like high temperatures or extreme pH levels. The integrity of these tests, therefore, depends on adequate storage conditions. Antibodies are also known to have relatively short shelf lives and typically degrade within one year.

PCR and Molecular Beacons

Another technology in the allergen detection field involves identifying DNA sequences from an allergenic ingredient using a combination of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and molecular beacons. Don’t worry, it’s not as complicated as it sounds.

One way to test for an allergenic ingredient is to detect DNA segments unique to that ingredient. DNA is made of two complementary strands, and when one strand finds its complement, they bind. Simple enough. PCR uses the complementary nature of DNA to identify and exponentially replicate target DNA strands. This replication makes the DNA strands easier to detect using what are called molecular beacons: specialized molecular tags that turn fluorescent upon binding to a target DNA strand. These illuminated beacons can then be measured with a fluorescence spectrometer. While PCR-based assays are sensitive and selective, these tests are generally better suited for laboratory environments because they require automated laboratory equipment.

Historically, molecular beacons have been used to detect nucleotide chains like DNA; more recently, molecular beacons are being used to bind and stain proteins–including allergens–instead of DNA sequences. In this approach, PCR is not necessary, as the molecular beacons attach directly to the protein. Notably, molecular beacon tags require a fluorescence spectrometer to measure the target allergenic protein or nucleotide sequences.

Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (Allergy Amulet’s Technology!)

Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) sensors are an exciting emerging technology. MIPs are highly-specialized plastic films molded to recognize a single target molecule, such as an allergenic protein or a chemical tracer for an allergenic ingredient. Historically, molecularly imprinted polymers have been used for drug separation and delivery. Only recently have MIPs been adapted for use as molecular recognition elements in electronic sensing devices.

Building an MIP is similar in concept to creating a lock for which the target molecule is the key. Our polymer films contain hundreds of trillions of cavities (locks), which recognize a specific target molecule (key) by size, shape, and complimentary electron charge distribution. The molding procedures used for MIPs mean that they can be designed to target a wide variety of molecular targets. Our Scientific Advisor, Dr. Joseph BelBruno, was the first to develop electronic MIP sensors for detecting nicotine and marijuana. Allergy Amulet is the first to develop MIP sensors for detecting allergenic ingredients.

   
  
    
  
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      Imprinted cavity molded to bind to a specific target molecule.

Imprinted cavity molded to bind to a specific target molecule.

Because the core ingredient in a MIP-based sensor is a specialized plastic, MIP films are highly durable and affordable to produce. The high specificity of target binding, coupled with a straightforward electrochemical resistance measurement, allows for rapid and portable testing.

That’s it! Now you know the science behind allergen detection methodologies. We hope you enjoyed geeking out with us for a short while. Until next time!

-        The Allergy Amulet Science Team

 

These scientific explanations have been simplified to accommodate our nontechnical readership. 

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A Look Behind the Label: How Food Manufacturers Prevent Allergen Cross-Contact

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In an earlier post, we explored food allergy labeling laws and why many food products include “may contain” statements. To better understand the extent to which these foods may in fact contain allergens, we’re going closer to the source: food manufacturers.

On nearly all matters concerning food safety, including allergen control, FDA-regulated food manufacturers follow the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Signed into law in 2011, FSMA introduced significant reforms to the nation’s food safety laws. For the first time, food manufacturers were required to develop and maintain a written “food safety plan.” FSMA also gave the FDA discretionary authority to approve or reject these food safety plans, giving auditors considerable interpretive power over which food safety plans would pass muster.

In 2015, the FDA published a final rule on Preventive Controls for Human Foods. This regulation is one of the key parts of FSMA and mandates that companies perform a Hazard Analysis and develop Risk-Based Preventive Controls (often referred to as “HARPC”).  The regulation requires manufacturers to identify and implement controls for any “reasonably foreseeable” food safety hazard–which includes the top eight most common allergens (tree nuts, peanuts, shellfish, finfish, soy, milk, egg, and wheat). Accordingly, if any of these allergens could end up in the final food product, manufacturers must implement preventive controls, defined as “written procedures the facility must have and implement to control allergen cross-contact.” Notably, allergen testing is currently discretionary, not required.

So how tough are these food safety plans on food allergens?

According to food safety expert Dr. Scott Brooks, pretty tough. “While FSMA is not prescriptive, food safety plans must stand up to scrutiny from FDA inspectors. The FDA has published industry guidance to help ensure FSMA compliance, and those in the industry know that it’s important to follow the FDA’s guidance documents.” While not finalized, the FDA draft guidance document on HARPC advises implementing controls to prevent cross-contact, and other measures including product sequencing and sanitation controls.

Most larger companies invest considerable resources into food allergen management, according to food safety expert Dr. Bert Popping. Indeed, “large manufacturers often test foods for trace allergens and have allergen management controls in place.” Dr. Popping notes however that “a number of typically small and medium-sized companies have no allergen management in place, and accordingly will often issue precautionary statements like ‘may contain’ for legal reasons, without performing any risk assessment.”

Further guidance on HARPC will be important for advancing safety measures around allergen control at food manufacturers. Until then, we may have to settle for “may.”

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

 

This piece was written by the Allergy Amulet team and reviewed by Dr. Bert Popping and Dr. Scott Brooks for accuracy. 

Dr. Bert Popping is the managing director of FOCOS, a food consulting group based in Germany. Dr. Popping has over 20 years of experience in the food industry, and has authored over 50 publications on topics including food authenticity, food analysis, validation, and regulatory assessments.

Dr. Scott Brooks is a food safety consultant and founder of River Run Consulting. He is the former Senior VP of Quality & Food Safety, Scientific and Regulatory Affairs at Kraft Foods, and prior to that was the VP of Global Food Safety, Scientific & Regulatory Affairs, and Quality Policy at PepsiCo.

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OAS—A Seasonal Mess?

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                         Photo copyright©    National Jewish Health   . All rights reserved. Used by permission.

                      Photo copyright© National Jewish Health. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Ahh, summer. The season of pool parties, barbecues, gardening, and outdoor adventure. For many though, summer also means seasonal allergies. That’s right, runny noses, itchy eyes, and nasal congestion. But how about an itchy mouth?

If you’ve ever bitten into a raw apple, banana, or piece of celery and experienced an itchy mouth, you’re not alone. This reaction occurs because the proteins found in some raw fruits and vegetables are very similar to those found in plant pollen. Your body perceives these similarly structured proteins as pollen allergens – this recognition overlap is also referred to as cross-reactivity. If you’ve experienced this reaction before, you may have oral allergy syndrome (OAS). Or what Allergy Amulet allergist advisor Dr. John Lee calls: The most common allergy you don’t know you have.

So now you’re probably wondering if you’ve ever experienced OAS, right? The most common symptoms include: itchiness or swelling of the mouth, lips, face, tongue, and throat. These symptoms typically appear right after eating raw fruits or vegetables. OAS is considered a mild form of food allergy, and only in very rare instances has OAS resulted in more serious allergic reactions like anaphylaxis.

Now that we’ve defined OAS, let’s take a closer look at which common plant pollens most often cross react with which fruits and vegetables: 

It’s important to note that OAS isn’t limited to the above chart of fruits and vegetables—certain spices, legumes (peanuts and soybeans), and nuts (almonds and hazelnuts), can also bring about OAS symptoms as well.

The good news? Many people affected by OAS can eat the same fruits or vegetables when they are cooked. Heat alters the protein structure in the food so that the immune system no longer recognizes them as similar to pollen proteins. Peeling these fruits and vegetables before eating them can also stave off an OAS reaction, as these proteins are often concentrated in the skin. However, many allergists recommend avoiding the food in raw form altogether if it’s causing symptoms. Alternatively, consider eating canned versions of these nutritious favorites if you can’t resist them, as processing helps destroy the proteins typically involved in OAS.

If you've experienced OAS symptoms after eating a raw fruit or vegetable, it’s wise to talk to your health care provider or allergist. Because standard food allergen tests (skin prick or blood test) often come back negative for people with OAS, a diagnosis is often made when these traditional tests are coupled with a history of OAS symptoms. Some allergists perform what’s referred to as a “fresh prick by prick” test. This entails pricking the raw fruit or vegetable with a skin prick testing device and then pricking the skin of the patient. This test is generally more accurate because the proteins in raw fruits and vegetables are often not as processed as allergy extracts, which are commonly used in traditional skin prick tests.  

Fascinating.

If you have any questions about OAS, let us know! We’re always up for a good allergy chat.

- Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

 

Allergy Amulet advisors Dr. Jordan Scott and Dr. John Lee have reviewed this piece for accuracy. 

Dr. Scott is an allergist/immunologist and operates several private allergy clinics throughout the Boston area. He is on the board of overseers at Boston Children’s Hospital, and the past president of the Massachusetts Allergy and Asthma Society. Dr. Scott is an allergy/immunology instructor at the University of Massachusetts.

Dr. Lee is the clinical director of the food allergy program at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He is also the co-creator of AllergyHome.org, a website that offers online resources to help educate and promote awareness about food allergies in schools, camps, and other settings. Dr. Lee is widely recognized for his work in the food allergy space, and his commitment to patient health.

 

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Trick or Treat? Treat Please!

Let’s face it—when you have a child with food allergies, Halloween can be a scare. On the one hand, your neighbors are doling out candies that could unintentionally harm your child; on the other hand, you can’t simply tell your child that they’re barred from trick-or-treating. After all, we want our children to experience the same tradition of trick-or-treating that we enjoyed as kids!

As a Certified AllerCoach and mother of a daughter with food allergies, I’ve learned over the years that you have to get creative on this holiday. With a little planning and forethought, children with food allergies can have fun partaking in Halloween’s tomfoolery without the health risks.

Here are six ways to help make a food allergy Halloween a success:

1-    Trick-or-treat inside your home. This option works well with young children. Plant family members and friends behind different doors in your house, and when the child knocks on the door, someone pops out to hand them a treat that’s safe to eat. We did this last year and my kids loved it!

2-    Neighborhood trick-or-treat hacks. This option could be approached a few different ways! One approach is to research candies ahead of time that you know are safe for your child (e.g., sweet tarts or gummy bears). This way, your child is coached on which candies are safe to eat and which to turn down. They can also do a candy swap with friends at the end of the night and trade those candies they’re unable to eat for ones that are safe. This was the approach our CEO Abigail Barnes took as a child—she recalls that her brother and father benefited generously!

Another approach is choosing specific houses ahead of time that you know will have safe candies available. This requires a bit more work as you may have to call neighbors and friends to see what treats they plan to offer. Alternatively, you can plant safe treats at these houses.

One other strategy is to place a few safe snacks in your child’s trick-or-treat bag ahead of time so that if the kids start snacking while trick-or-treating, your child has some safe go-to snacks at the ready.

And follow the teal pumpkins! Thanks to the Teal Pumpkin Project, houses that display a teal pumpkin at their door are an indication that non-food treats will be available.

3-    Wear costumes with gloves. There are so many costume choices out there that include gloves, which is a great safety precaution to take—especially if your child has a very sensitive food allergy. Gloves provide a barrier between their hands and the candy, thereby minimizing  cross contact. So whether they want to be Spider Man, The Green Lantern, or Elsa, they’ll be covered.

4-    Get yourself a Switch Witch. My kids love our Switch Witch, who they’ve fondly named Esmerelda. The Switch Witch and The Magic of Switchcraft book encourages families to leave their candy out on Halloween night for the Switch Witch, who comes and replaces these candies with non-food treats for them to enjoy. This is a great option for kids with special dietary needs or for those families who simply want to promote healthy eating!

5-    Start a new tradition. Some of my favorite holiday memories as a child were the traditions my family created together. Instead of trick-or-treating, maybe go see a scary movie or start a Halloween scavenger hunt in your neighborhood and encourage neighbors and friends to get involved! You can also host a Halloween bash at your house, where you can control what food is served.

No matter how you celebrate Halloween, the most important thing is to manage your child’s expectations and set ground rules ahead of time. This will help ensure your child’s safety, while also letting them take full advantage of all that childhood has to offer.

We wish you all a spooky and safe Halloween!

-       Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

 

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