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Food Allergies at School

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Food Allergy Advocacy in Schools

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Sending your child off to school is worrisome enough as a parent—but when your child has a food allergy, that anxiety amplifies. 

My daughter is highly allergic to peanuts—off the charts allergic. Three years ago, when she was in kindergarten, I frequently received calls from her school that she had experienced a topical allergic reaction. Given the severity of her allergy, and the fact that they sold PB&Js in the cafeteria, this didn’t come as a surprise.

Her school had archaic food allergy protocols and procedures in place, and didn’t seem to grasp the severity of the situation. Their cafeteria was effectively a minefield for my daughter!

You should know: I'm not the kind of person that accepts the things I can't change. I change the things I can't accept. And I couldn’t accept living in constant fear for my daughter’s life.  

Fast forward three years, and her school district now has a food allergy awareness program in place and is making considerable strides to keep children with food allergies safe. 

How did this come to be? A few things happened. 

First, I engaged the school nurse. When I initially relayed my concerns, her response was, "We have food allergy guidelines in place." Now, let’s be clear, these guidelines weren’t routinely followed or required—they were recommendations. I felt for her, because she truly didn’t seem to grasp the seriousness of the situation; in her defense, she grew up in a time when food allergies weren’t an epidemic. 

It was then I realized what was missing—a true understanding of what was going on. People don’t know what they don’t know! 

In my heart I know that no parent, teacher, or school nurse would ever do anything to intentionally harm my child, yet there seemed to be a serious lack of awareness around the severity of her food allergies. 

My first goal was to make sure the district removed PB&J sandwiches and nut products from school cafeterias. After that, I focused on promoting education and awareness within the schools, and with children and their families. We needed to foster an environment of inclusivity, which I felt was sorely lacking. 

I’ve learned that adults find change difficult, but children usually embrace it!

Change is usually most successful with smart, slow, and strategic execution. We published a series of educational articles in weekly school newsletters and integrated food allergy awareness and education into school events (e.g., PTA meetings, school assemblies, book fairs, harvest days, etc.). We also organized book readings and games to coincide with national Food Allergy Awareness Week

The children embraced learning how to keep their allergic classmates and friends safe, and in turn, educated their parents by sharing what they learned in school. Coming home from school with a sticker that said, "I kept Sophia safe today,” prompted their parents to ask about the meaning of the sticker, and often began a conversation about food allergies. If mom or dad was making a PB&J sandwich for lunch the next day, their children might say, "Don’t make me that! It’s not safe for my friend!"

There are eleven elementary schools within our school district. We piloted this program at one school, then another, and another, and soon our awareness and education program was implemented throughout the entire district! In the meantime, we collaborated with the district administration to update and rewrite the food allergy protocols and procedures, and built food allergy education into lesson plans. We also created a district-wide food allergy informational brochure for incoming and existing families within our schools. 

Our efforts weren’t met without resistance, and these achievements took time and patience. I’ve learned that to work collaboratively and effectively with schools and other parents, it’s important to be clear and explain the WHY. Why are we removing peanut butter from schools? Why is my daughter unable to bring in cupcakes for her birthday? From experience, once someone understands the WHY, they often embrace the change. In turn, they often become a food allergy advocate themselves! 

- Abbe Large 

 

Abbe Large is a Senior Vice President at Lenox Advisors. She has held leadership positions within her school district’s PTA and currently sits on her town’s education committee. Abbe is a minority investor in Allergy Amulet.

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Airborne Food Allergens—What’s the Risk?

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When we hear stories of serious allergic reactions to food, they often involve someone unknowingly ingesting a food that contains their allergen. Gut-wrenching stories like the grilled cheese that killed a NYC preschooler, the Indian takeout food fatality in England, the woman left paralyzed after ingesting peanuts while traveling in Budapest, and the sesame-related death of a teenage girl after eating a Prèt A Manger baguette at an airport. 

For many of us, these stories hit a bit too close to home.

In these cases, the food was ingested—but what happens when the allergen goes airborne?  

In January, a story about an 11-year-old New Jersey boy rocked headlines after he died from what authorities believe was an allergic reaction from breathing in the steam from fish cooking in the kitchen. 

While rare, allergic reactions to aerosolized allergens do occur. 

According to Dr. John Lee, Clinical Director of the Boston Children’s Food Allergy Program, most airborne reactions probably occur due to particles of protein that rise into the air when food is actively cooked, and then they’re inhaled. “I’ve had patients describe their throat itching while around peanuts, or reported mild reactions on airplanes, but most airborne reactions typically result from particles of protein rising off heated foods.” For example, he offers someone with a shellfish allergy walking into a seafood restaurant, or a wheat-allergic patient standing near boiling pasta.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, exposure to airborne food allergens does not typically result in anaphylaxis; however, these airborne particulates can cause symptoms such as itchy eyes, a runny nose, a cough, congestion, and difficulty breathing.

Airborne food particulates can also trigger two forms of occupational asthma: 1) baker’s asthma, following exposure to powdered allergen substances such as dried egg powder, soy flour, or wheat flour during baking; and 2) crab asthma, which is caused by dust and fume exposure from steaming, cooking, or scrubbing crab in processing plants. Both forms of asthma are considered allergic diseases because of the role allergenic proteins play in the respiratory response.

Notably, airborne allergic reactions aren’t limited to food. In at least one case, a chemical fragrance was the culprit. After a teenager named Brandon started developing headaches and hives at school, he connected his symptoms to Axe Body Spray. His allergy to the spray worsened, eventually leading to anaphylactic shock. Laws protecting manufacturers like Axe barred disclosure of the spray’s full ingredients list, preventing his family from discovering the allergenic trigger. Brandon had to leave school because of the exposure risks. 

Suffice it to say, airborne allergenic reactions extend beyond food. 

Most reported airborne reactions, however, continue to stem from common allergenic foods. Since peanut is the number one trigger of food-related anaphylaxis, the extent to which peanut particulates pose a risk is a common question in the food allergy community. 

In a 2003 study of 30 children with severe peanut allergies, researchers examined the extent to which inhalation and skin exposure elicited a reaction. For the skin test, one third of children experienced reddening or skin flares after peanut butter was pressed to their skin for one minute. Conversely, no child experienced respiratory symptoms after sitting in close proximity to three ounces of peanut butter for ten minutes.

The topic of aerosolized allergenic reactions has stirred enough controversy among food-allergic travelers that Southwest Airlines stopped serving peanuts on all flights starting in August 2018, and JetBlue does not serve peanuts on its aircrafts.

Food for thought? We think so. Have you experienced an airborne allergen causing an allergic reaction? Please share your experience if so! 

- Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

This piece was written by the Allergy Amulet team and reviewed by Allergy Amulet advisors Dr. John Lee and Dr. Jordan Scott. 

Dr. John Lee is the Clinical Director of the Food Allergy Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Lee is widely recognized for his work in food allergy, and his commitment to patient health. 

Dr. Scott is an allergist/immunologist and operates several private allergy clinics throughout the Boston area. He is on the board of overseers at Boston Children’s Hospital, and the past President of the Massachusetts Allergy and Asthma Society. 

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Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, Sugar is Sweet, and Food Allergies Can Be Sweet Too

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Ah, Valentine’s Day. For some, this day provides a great excuse to press pause on the stressors of life and take time to celebrate the ones you love. For those with food allergies and intolerances, however, this day can bring about a lot of anxiety. 

If you’re a food allergy parent like me, here’s what probably goes through your head: Will my child be given a valentine that contains their allergen? What will be served at school? Will they feel comfortable speaking up to ensure the treat is safe? Why does this holiday have to center around food?!

If you are celebrating Valentine’s Day as a food-allergic adult, it can be just as stressful. Valentine’s Day often comes in the form of chocolates, or a splurge on a nice dinner and dessert (in our house that means sushi)!

We get it guys. This holiday can be hard. That’s why we’ve teamed up with our friend chef Ming Tsai to bring you a homemade sweet treat this Valentine’s Day. 

Easy? Check. Healthy? Check. Top eight allergen free AND gluten free AND sesame free? Check check check. 

Here’s Chef Tsai’s recipe for Strawberry Coconut Sorbet (note: this recipe contains coconut). 

Strawberry Coconut Sorbet (serves 2)

- 1/2 cup frozen strawberries

- 1/2 cup coconut milk

- 1/4 teaspoon lemon zest

- 2 tablespoons unsweetened coconut flakes

Add strawberries, coconut milk, and zest to a blender and blend until just smooth. Serve immediately and garnish with coconut flakes or cacao nibs (or whatever your heart desires 😍).  

Enjoy friends!

XOXO, 

Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Navigating Food Allergies as a Teen

Most social gatherings as a teenager involve food. School dances involve going out to eat with your friends before the dance, and eating snacks during the dance. Going on a first date often involves going out to dinner or to a movie theater, where food is always present. Birthday parties almost always involve cake and ice cream during the celebration. We even have a holiday every year to celebrate being thankful for a plentiful harvest: Thanksgiving. All of these gatherings involve some sort of interaction with food. 

When you have food allergies, however, these common social gatherings are not just a matter of socialization. They are a matter of survival.           

I’m a teenager that’s just trying to fit in and be as “normal” as everyone else. This can make speaking up and asking for an alternative food option a scary task. What if they say no? What if they force me to leave? Worst of all, what if I have a reaction? All of these questions fly through my mind when I’m invited to hang out with friends, extended family, or to any other social gathering.    

I used to “make plans” or say I was busy just so I could avoid the awkward first communication of “oh sorry I can’t have that.” Though I’ve had some extremely positive social experiences that have made it easier to manage my food allergies! I remember one birthday party specifically. I was talking to my friend’s mother about my allergy and how I was going to avoid the birthday cake. Out of nowhere, she surprised me with a 100-piece bag of Starburst. She explained that my friend wanted to make sure that I could enjoy his birthday even though I couldn’t eat the cake. 

Dating can also bring about challenging situations. My freshman year of high school I took a date to watch a varsity high school soccer game. It was half time and she was hungry. I had eaten before the game, in order to prevent getting hungry at the game and being tempted to eat something there. We went up to the concession stand and she ordered a Snickers bar. Because I have a peanut allergy, this was a very awkward situation. Before we sat down, I reminded her of my allergy and she felt so bad—but I felt even worse. It was our first date and I didn’t want to do anything that would scare her. She quickly ate her Snickers bar and washed her hands.

Dating often involves food. Inevitably you will end up in situations like picking a restaurant or a snack at a movie theater, which is usually a good time to explain your allergy (and explain your choice of snack or restaurant). If your partner truly wants to be in a relationship with you, they’ll understand why you go to the same Mexican restaurant every week: it’s a safe choice for you. 

As a teenager, I’ve learned to advocate for myself and not be afraid to reject food that doesn’t have a label or is “so delicious it’s worth dying for” (yes, I’ve had people that didn’t know I had an allergy say that to me). While our parents advocate for us when we’re younger, as a teen they’re not with us as often, and we have to learn to be our own advocates. 

Every year I attend FARE’s National Conference and I hear a familiar discussion about the dialogue between food-allergic teens and their parents. Teens often talk about how their parents watch over them closely, and how they want to manage their allergies independently. Parents often ask me how their child can become more independent, and to that I say that they should give their teenager more of a chance to self advocate. I’ve always taken responsibility for keeping track of my auto-injectors, asking waiters about my allergies at restaurants, and speaking up in situations when I don’t feel comfortable. Teens don’t always do those things in front of their parents because their parents do it before the teen has the chance to.

This is a two-way street that involves cooperation and trust on both sides. As dangerous as the world can seem for a teen managing a food allergy, most food-allergic teens have looked that danger in the face for their entire lives. It isn’t going to stop them from living life to the fullest. Sure there will be times of difficulty, but that difficulty is only temporary. 

The one thing I want everyone to take away from this blog is this: speak up. 

Don’t be afraid of any challenge that comes your way, food allergies or not. Through my food allergy advocacy volunteer efforts I’ve met senators, mayors, CEO’s, entrepreneurs, and other amazing people with inspiring stories. Many have said that an issue becomes more impactful when a teen speaks up about it. If a teen is concerned, shouldn’t adults be as well? Every obstacle you face and every challenge that you meet can be overcome. Your voice is a powerful tool, so don’t be afraid to use it! 

 

Daytona Hodson is junior in high school and has a life-threatening food allergy to peanuts. He’s on his high school debate team and he’s a member of FARE’s Teen Advisory Group. Daytona has contributed to articles and spoken on panels for both FARE and Spokin. 

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Take Two: The Importance of Carrying Two Epinephrine Auto-injectors

With Halloween around the bend, we wanted to share a quick PSA on the importance of carrying two epinephrine auto-injectors in case of an allergic reaction. 

Why? Let’s look at the facts.

In cases of severe anaphylaxis, one dose of epinephrine is often not enough. Up to 20% of people who receive an initial dose of epinephrine for anaphylaxis require a second injection. This can happen even without further exposure to the allergenic trigger! A second allergic reaction called biphasic anaphylaxis can occur between 1 to 72 hours (typically eight hours) after the initial reaction.

Despite these harrowing stats, most individuals do not carry two auto-injectors.

In a study of roughly 1,000 US patients and caregivers with epinephrine prescriptions, 82% said they do not carry two auto-injectors. Meanwhile, 75% of respondents reported previously administering epinephrine. Of those that sought emergency care, 45% did so because a second dose of epinephrine was unavailable. 

Education and awareness is also lacking. Only a quarter of respondents reported that they were advised to carry two auto-injectors.

But epinephrine is expensive.

We hear you. Epinephrine auto-injectors are not cheap, which can make it difficult to have multiple epinephrine auto-injectors on your person at all times.  

Fortunately, that’s starting to change. Increased market competition and PR scandals like the one that rocked Mylan have helped drive down the price. 

Additionally, below are some cost-saving options worth checking out. 

-      Check for discount codes and savings plans on manufacturer websites. 

-      Purchase generic epinephrine alternatives.

-      Explore mail-order pharmacy options (you may be able to receive a larger supply of medication at a lower co-pay amount if these benefits apply).

-      Price shop between local pharmacies—prices vary, especially between large chains and small pharmacies.

-      Ask your doctor about patient assistance programs. 

-      Switch to your insurance carrier’s “preferred” auto-injector (if applicable).

-      Double check that your pharmacy has applied all possible coupons at check out.

-      Ask your company’s HR department if they offer financial assistance to employees to cover prescriptions.

We hope you all have a SWEET and SAFE Halloween! And don’t forget to TAKE TWO!

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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The 411 on the 504: School Allergy Plans Decoded

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Last month we covered the basics of kids and epinephrine. This month we’re bringing you the skinny on school management plans for your child’s food allergies.

Are you wondering about a 504? An IEP? Have we lost you? 

Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. 

Setting Up the Plan

Most school districts have district-wide plans for food allergy management, treatment, and reaction prevention. Many states also offer suggestions for school districts on managing food allergies based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To date, there is no federal regulation that standardizes these policies and procedures, so these policies vary between states (and often between school districts within each state). 

The first step in setting up an allergy management plan for your child is to reach out to your child’s school. Many schools will ask you and your child’s doctor to fill out an allergy and anaphylaxis emergency plan form, although this form can go by different names. This form covers what steps school staff should take in case the child is exposed to an allergen or if he/she exhibits symptoms of a reaction. The American Academy of Pediatrics published this template form for reference. Once submitted, the school nurse typically prepares an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP): an internal document that outlines the processes the school should follow in the event the child experiences an allergic reaction. 

Some parents go one step further and request a 504 plan. Section 504 is part of a federal civil rights law that protects individuals with disabilities and health conditions, including life-threatening food allergies. The law applies to all schools and programs that receive financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education (so all public schools and some private schools). A 504 plan lays out how the school should prevent and respond to allergic events. If a 504 plan protocol is not followed, there are several dispute resolution options available for parents. 

To secure a 504 plan, a parent must contact the school district’s 504 coordinator, who works with school officials to determine if the child qualifies. This determination is based in part on medical history, so your doctor may need to provide the school with this information. If the child qualifies, the team will work together to determine what special accommodations and protocols must be followed. 

Notably, if your child has a disability and qualifies for an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), a separate 504 plan is not necessary. The child’s food allergy accommodations may be joined under their IEP. Also of note, in some non-religious private schools where 504 plans do not apply, parents may rely on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to ensure that the school implements a food allergy management plan for the child. 

School Policy Options

Since there are no national standards for food allergy protocols, policies vary widely between schools. 

According to a recent study surveying school nurses across the country, the most frequently reported policies include: training school staff to respond to allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, using epinephrine autoinjectors, and managing for cross-contact in cafeterias. Other policies commonly implemented include: community food allergy awareness events, designated lunch areas for children with food allergies, and food guidelines for classroom celebrations.

The least frequently reported policies were: allergen labeling information in cafeterias, food management policies for after-school activities, and school-provided stock epinephrine for field trips and off-campus outings. In light of the differences between school policies, parents should understand their school’s protocols before developing their child’s plan.

Words of Wisdom

Finally, we talked with a few food allergy parents in different school districts and asked them to share a few words of wisdom on these management plans:

- “Plans may be different within the same school system—as your child goes from elementary to middle to high school, you will want to revisit your plan. For example, once a child moves to a different school building, new protocols may be appropriate. Older children may also be allowed to self-carry epinephrine or antihistamines.”

- “Make sure your plan or school policies cover transportation to and from school if your child rides the school bus.”

- “Think about after-school plans for your older child, as middle and high school students often have plans with friends after school. For example: can they store their medicine in a school locker during the day–even if the school doesn’t allow self-carry–so that they are prepared to go to a friend’s house or activity directly after?”

We hope this rundown of plan options, food allergy management policies, and parenting wisdom helps you to better advocate for your child’s food allergy needs!

-      Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Best Practices for Kids + Epinephrine

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I’m not quite sure how summer passed by so quickly. Is it really back-to-school season already?! As families gear up for the school year ahead, we thought it would be a great time to review current best practices for kids and epinephrine—something every parent should know even if your child has no food allergies! 

Here are a few things to remember as you prepare for your child’s fun (and safe!) return to school.

Educating Your School Tribe

It’s a good idea to get your child’s food allergies on the radar of their school caretakers before the year begins—especially if your child is changing schools. Contact their school nurse and teacher to plan for where the epinephrine will be stored and how it will be used in case of an emergency. You may also want to discuss how snacks and treats are handled in the classroom. Many schools have food allergy policies in place, but some protocols are at the teacher’s discretion. 

It doesn’t hurt to schedule a face-to-face with your child, teachers, and caregivers before school starts to talk through your food allergy game plan. As a bonus, this gives your child an opportunity to meet their teacher before the year begins and help them tackle some of those first-day jitters! 

Epi Dosing Options

There are currently three different epinephrine dosages available. For adults and kids who weigh more than 30 kilograms (~66 pounds), the recommended dose is 0.3 milligrams. For smaller kids weighing between 15 and 30 kilograms (~33-66 pounds), the recommended dose is 0.15 milligrams. Several brands offer both dosing options, including EpiPen, Adrenaclick, and Auvi-Q.  

For infants and toddlers who weigh between 7.5 and 15 kilograms (~16.5-33 pounds), Auvi-Q makes an auto-injector with a lower dosage (0.1 milligrams), which also features a smaller needle. 

Make sure to check with your doctor to determine the best option for your child! 

Safe Storage

Remember that epinephrine is temperature sensitive. The medication should be stored at room temperature and never in extreme hot or cold climates (e.g., car glove compartments). Some brands also recommend that users periodically check to ensure the liquid has not changed color. If the solution assumes a pinkish or brownish hue, this can indicate decreased effectiveness. Epinephrine is light sensitive too—so store your auto-injectors in cases!  

Parents should work with their child’s school or daycare provider to map out a plan for both on-site and off-site storage (e.g., field trips), to ensure availability and maximum effectiveness. 

Using Your Epinephrine

As explained in one of our earlier blog posts, the outer thigh is the best place to administer the injection, even through clothing if necessary. Most manufacturers offer videos on their websites to demonstrate how to use their product. These can be a great resource for new caregivers and anyone that should be prepared for an allergic emergency. Like CPR, administering epinephrine is a good skill for any parent to have in their arsenal.

Replacing Your Supply

Currently, most auto-injectors expire within 12 to 18 months. Make sure to check your epinephrine expiration dates and mark them in your calendar. A good rule of thumb is to always have two auto-injectors in close proximity to any food-allergic child in case one is defunct (and in some cases, two injections may be required!). 

As you replace old auto-injectors, remember that some manufacturers offer coupons or other financial assistance, especially for lower income families.  

While we hope you never have to use an epinephrine auto-injector, we share these reminders to keep all of our children safe as we send them off to the classroom! 

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team  

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What Food Allergies Can Teach Our Kids

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Every now and again, I like to write about my personal experience as a mom managing food allergies. Parenting is no easy feat, but it’s especially tough when you're raising a child that could stop breathing if accidentally exposed to certain foods.   

Although peanut and tree nut allergies are not something I would have chosen for my daughter, there has been an upside to her having food allergies. For one, our family has to look more carefully at the ingredients we put into our bodies, which has made us healthier eaters. The greatest gifts, however, have come in the form of life skills and values my daughter has learned at a young age.

Below are a few that immediately come to mind. 

Diligence. Now that my daughter is entering kindergarten, she’s starting to take charge of carrying emergency medicines to and from activities and storing them appropriately. Increasingly, she’s having to brave the world without me. Whether at school, summer camp, or a birthday party, she knows it’s her responsibility to ask if a food is safe when I’m not there to help her read the label. 

What has she learned? To be detail oriented and persistent—qualities that will help her in countless facets of life. 

Compassion. We talk to our daughter often about things that make her unique, like food allergies and wearing glasses. I find these talks help her relate to the differences between people both physically and situationally. Last year we saw a homeless family outside of a local store asking for money. After she asked me a few questions to better understand the situation, she decided we should give them the snacks we brought in the car so that they wouldn’t be hungry. Cue my proud mama heart swelling! 

Compassion is one of those life skills that will serve her well as a child AND as an adult. 

Time Management. It takes time managing food allergies! Label reading and meal planning take a lot longer when you have to think about a food allergy. Our daughter completed OIT for her nut allergies in 2017, and while it’s now been a year since we finished, she still has a daily maintenance dose of several nuts and a mandatory hour-long rest period afterward. It can be hard to find time to squeeze in her maintenance dose and rest time each day (today it was sandwiched between summer school and a T-ball game!).

Showing her how we map out each day and carve out time to manage her food allergies has been a great lesson in time management that will serve her well as she enters “big kid school” this fall. 

Bravery. It can be hard to stand up for yourself, let alone when you’re a small child! Food allergies have nudged her to become her own self-advocate (and a food allergy advocate!). I’d like to think we’ve led by example as her champion and guardians all these years and I’m proud to see her now standing up for herself (and her health). 

I hope her bravery goes beyond self-advocacy. I hope her newfound courage leads her to try new things, persevere through adversity, and stand up for others in need.

We all have moments when food allergies feel defeating, inconvenient, and stressful. But for all the woes allergies bring, they can also be a gift. It all boils down to perspective. Adversity breeds strength, and I see that strength in my daughter more and more each day.

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Spokin’s Susie Hultquist: A Fearless Food Allergy Mama!

Susie and her food-allergic daughter, Natalie.

Susie and her food-allergic daughter, Natalie.

If you’ve followed Allergy Amulet for a while, you know our team was founded by a female and that we love to support female entrepreneurs!

Unsurprisingly, we’re big fans of Susie Hultquist and the team she’s assembled at Spokin. This Chi-town team has built an app to help make managing food allergies easier! We recently sat down with Susie and asked her a few questions.

1. We understand you left your financial career on Wall Street to start Spokin. When did the “light bulb” moment happen?

It happened when my co-worker was selling girl scout cookies. I wanted to buy some, but in order to do that, I had to get ahold of a package to check the label and ensure they were safe for my family. I then went to their website to make sure the cookies were also available in our area. It took me 15 minutes to track down all the information I needed! That’s when I realized I was probably not the only person managing food allergies searching for this same information, and that there was a clear need to streamline and consolidate food safety information for the food allergy community.

At the time I was managing my company’s consumer internet portfolio and saw how different businesses were managing pain points. No one was solving this one, and I felt I was uniquely positioned to do so.

2. How long did it take to launch the app? 

It was two years in the making. I started by meeting with a lot of people who have food allergies. From there, we developed a content strategy and hired a graphic designer to work on app designs. We just celebrated the app’s first birthday!

3. What is your “why”?

My daughter Natalie. She’s allergic to peanuts and several tree nuts. I am determined to make her life easier and to help her live the fullest life possible. That’s what gets me up every day. 

A food allergy diagnosis often comes with a lot of no’s when it comes to food, and I want to be able to say yes as often as I can!

4. Spokin has a lot of new features and capabilities on the app. What are you most excited about?

Far and away is the map functionality! If you’re in the app and search within the “eateries” category you can choose any city in the US and see in seconds all the restaurants, bakeries, and ice cream shops others in the Spokin community have recommended. We now have 2.7 million reviews on the app and reviews span across 18 countries! 

To find in seconds all these yes’s after so many no’s is amazing. And it’s built by the food allergy community! This community is so generous. 

5. What does Spokin mean?

It’s a play on the word spoken. I had so many amazing interactions with people in the food allergy community that gave me advice verbally (where to eat in London, what chocolate chips to bake with, what to take with us on an airplane, etc.) but once spoken, that advice then vanished into thin air. All of this knowledge needed to be captured and shared with everyone. The idea was that if we built this platform, we could harness and share all of this great food wisdom with the food allergy community at large. 

6. When do you plan to release the Android version of the app?

We have started an Android waiting list and it’s on our product roadmap. We’re currently assessing demand, so please add your email to the Android list on our website, if interested! 

7. When you’re not focused on helping the food allergy community, what do you enjoy doing?

Spending time with my girls and my husband! We love to cook together, run together, and travel when we can. My girls all have very different interests so it’s fun to watch them pursue their passions. 

8. Since Spokin is based in Chicago, we have to know: do you cheer for the White Sox or the Cubs?

I love the Cubs, but I applaud the White Sox for offering peanut-free ballgames!

9. What’s your long-term vision for Spokin?

If everyone in the US with food allergies shared five recommendations we could build a database of 75 million data points that everyone can access! We’ve estimated that if it takes you 15 minutes a day to manage food allergies, then you can save a year of your life by having all of this information accessible to you. 

If you haven’t downloaded the Spokin app we recommend you check it out ASAP! Both Susie (Susie in the Spokin app) and Allergy Amulet’s founder, Abi Barnes, (allergy_amulet_abi in the Spokin app) have provided lots of recommendations!

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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My Child Doesn’t Have a Food Allergy... But Her Friends Do

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When my family moved to a new neighborhood five years ago, we quickly learned that our new neighbors’ oldest son had a severe peanut allergy. Our children became fast friends, and the kids went back and forth between the two houses all the time. None of our three children have food allergies, so this was very new to us. To ensure that he was safe while under our care, we knew we had to get up to speed on how to keep him out of harm’s way (and well fed!).

Here are the top 10 tips we’ve learned, in case you find yourself in a similar situation:

1)    Ask the Question. Inviting a new friend over for a play date or sharing snacks at the park? Always ask the other parent or caregiver if their child has any food allergies. Allergy parents are often grateful if you bring it up!

2)    Read Labels. Get to know the ingredients of the snack foods you regularly buy. Which granola bars contain tree nuts? Which crackers are made in a facility that processes peanuts? At a minimum, know where to look on the packaging to find allergen info. I’m often surprised when a food I would have considered to be nut-free actually isn’t. We’ve created a cheat sheet for you to learn the rules of label reading!

3)    Keep the Original Packaging. It’s so much easier to check the ingredient list on a box of crackers if it is still in the original packaging. Often, similar products made by different companies have different allergy warnings and ingredients. 

4)    Have Allergen-Free Snacks on Hand. Consider offering fresh fruits, veggies, or cheese for kids who can eat dairy. We’ve found that parents of kids with allergies are happy to make suggestions for healthy and safe snacks that everyone can enjoy. As an added bonus, minimally processed foods are healthier anyway!

5)    Think About Cross-Contact. When you make a PB&J for your child, does the knife go in both jars? If so, that jam may contain peanuts. I try to use two different knives, but if we have a friend over with a peanut allergy, I open a new jar of jam rather than risk an allergic reaction.

6)    Keep Up the Hand Washing. We all know we should have kids wash hands before eating, but what about afterwards? If your kids eat a peanut butter sandwich, be mindful that their hands may have peanut residue on them, which could pose a risk to those with peanut allergies! Post-meal hand washing also helps keep those toys clean! 🙌  

7)    Think Outside the House. When we carpool with the neighbor that has a peanut allergy, I wipe down the car handles and other surfaces that our kids touch, especially since our family often eats in the car! Let’s be honest, don’t we all? 😉

8)    Make Birthday Parties Inclusive. Ask about food allergies on the invitation. For an electronic invite, you can list what you are planning to serve. We have a child in one of my kids’ friend groups with an egg allergy. His mom is always willing to bring alternative snacks and treats, so a heads up is appreciated in case she needs to plan ahead! 

9)    Know and Support Your School’s Rules. Our elementary school has some classrooms that are nut free, so we always pack nut-free snacks. The lunchrooms are generally nut friendly, with designated nut-free tables. If my child wants to eat with a friend who sits at the nut-free table, he also needs a nut-free lunch. It’s important to avoid undermining the school’s allergen policies. There are plenty of delicious food options for your child that will also keep their friends safe!

10)   Make it Easy on Older Kids. Older kids don’t want you hyper-managing their food choices, especially when they aren’t your children. Make it easy for teens and tweens to self-manage their food allergies by offering plenty of safe options and letting them choose. 

With these guidelines in place, we have been able to successfully navigate the food allergy terrain while keeping our children’s friends safe (and bellies full!).

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team

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