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Best Practices for Kids + Epinephrine

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I’m not quite sure how summer passed by so quickly. Is it really back-to-school season already?! As families gear up for the school year ahead, we thought it would be a great time to review current best practices for kids and epinephrine—something every parent should know even if your child has no food allergies! 

Here are a few things to remember as you prepare for your child’s fun (and safe!) return to school.

Educating Your School Tribe

It’s a good idea to get your child’s food allergies on the radar of their school caretakers before the year begins—especially if your child is changing schools. Contact their school nurse and teacher to plan for where the epinephrine will be stored and how it will be used in case of an emergency. You may also want to discuss how snacks and treats are handled in the classroom. Many schools have food allergy policies in place, but some protocols are at the teacher’s discretion. 

It doesn’t hurt to schedule a face-to-face with your child, teachers, and caregivers before school starts to talk through your food allergy game plan. As a bonus, this gives your child an opportunity to meet their teacher before the year begins and help them tackle some of those first-day jitters! 

Epi Dosing Options

There are currently three different epinephrine dosages available. For adults and kids who weigh more than 30 kilograms (~66 pounds), the recommended dose is 0.3 milligrams. For smaller kids weighing between 15 and 30 kilograms (~33-66 pounds), the recommended dose is 0.15 milligrams. Several brands offer both dosing options, including EpiPen, Adrenaclick, and Auvi-Q.  

For infants and toddlers who weigh between 7.5 and 15 kilograms (~16.5-33 pounds), Auvi-Q makes an auto-injector with a lower dosage (0.1 milligrams), which also features a smaller needle. 

Make sure to check with your doctor to determine the best option for your child! 

Safe Storage

Remember that epinephrine is temperature sensitive. The medication should be stored at room temperature and never in extreme hot or cold climates (e.g., car glove compartments). Some brands also recommend that users periodically check to ensure the liquid has not changed color. If the solution assumes a pinkish or brownish hue, this can indicate decreased effectiveness. Epinephrine is light sensitive too—so store your auto-injectors in cases!  

Parents should work with their child’s school or daycare provider to map out a plan for both on-site and off-site storage (e.g., field trips), to ensure availability and maximum effectiveness. 

Using Your Epinephrine

As explained in one of our earlier blog posts, the outer thigh is the best place to administer the injection, even through clothing if necessary. Most manufacturers offer videos on their websites to demonstrate how to use their product. These can be a great resource for new caregivers and anyone that should be prepared for an allergic emergency. Like CPR, administering epinephrine is a good skill for any parent to have in their arsenal.

Replacing Your Supply

Currently, most auto-injectors expire within 12 to 18 months. Make sure to check your epinephrine expiration dates and mark them in your calendar. A good rule of thumb is to always have two auto-injectors in close proximity to any food-allergic child in case one is defunct (and in some cases, two injections may be required!). 

As you replace old auto-injectors, remember that some manufacturers offer coupons or other financial assistance, especially for lower income families.  

While we hope you never have to use an epinephrine auto-injector, we share these reminders to keep all of our children safe as we send them off to the classroom! 

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team  

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FOMO: Fear of Missing Out… On Nutrients

Part II: Wheat, Soy, Peanuts, and Tree Nuts

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Welcome to Part II of our FOMO series! Here we’re discussing how to replace nutrients lost from eliminating wheat, soy, peanuts, or tree nuts from your diet. You can find Part I here covering dairy, eggs, fish, and shellfish.

If you’re used to eating toast, cereal, pancakes, or other baked goods for breakfast, avoiding foods that contain wheat will likely be a hard adjustment. Or maybe you fed peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to your first child with no issue and your second child cannot eat peanut butter. It is an adjustment, to say the least! 

As a pediatric nutritionist, my work focuses on making sure kids with special dietary needs are getting the nutrients their growing bodies need. As you can imagine, many of my patients have multiple food allergies and have a fairly limited diet. The silver lining for these patients is that these children tend to have healthier diets because they’re avoiding lots of processed foods! 

I like to start by looking at each food that’s avoided and its corresponding nutrients side by side. As we discussed in Part I, this approach can make it less intimidating to identify other food sources for those lost nutrients.  

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Let’s take a closer look at a few of the nutrients needed when avoiding wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts.

Wheat products in America are fortified with B vitamins, thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin. 

Thiamin is important for maintaining a healthy metabolism and key function of cells. The major thiamin food sources are whole grains, meat, and fish. In the US, breads, cereals, and infant formulas are enriched with thiamin as well as other B vitamins. If you’re avoiding wheat and most breads and cereals, you may want to ensure your wheat-free products are enriched with these key nutrients as well!

Niacin is another B vitamin—B3 to be specific. Niacin helps our bodies use fat, protein, and carbohydrates to create energy. This vitamin is also enriched in processed wheat products and can be found naturally in most meats as well as mushrooms, avocados, and sunflower seeds, to name a few. 

If you’re a meat eater and wheat-avoider, I’m not typically concerned that you’re missing out on B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin) or iron. However, you may want to think about how much fiber is in your diet. Many people substitute rice, potatoes, and corn-based products for wheat. However, these are mostly low in fiber.

Fiber is a carbohydrate that your body does not digest. There are two types of fiber: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and helps to regulate blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and works to move food through the digestive tract. Many people experience symptoms like constipation after making a change in their diet. In these cases, I tell my patients to increase their fiber intake and add fruits, vegetables, legumes, brown rice, and other whole grains like oatmeal and quinoa. 

If you are not a meat eater, and you’ve eliminated wheat or soy, this next one is for you.

Iron is found in red meat, fish, and poultry, but there are many plant-based sources of iron outside of wheat and soy, including spinach, beans, lentils, nuts, seeds (e.g., pumpkin, chia, sunflower, and hemp), dried fruits, quinoa, and some fortified breakfast cereals. Iron is better absorbed with vitamin C, so I recommend adding an orange alongside your trail mix for your next snack. Calcium inhibits iron absorption, so whether you get your calcium from dairy or a dairy substitute, try to avoid eating them together. 

Avoiding soy is not easy because it is in so many foods. Both peanuts and soy belong to the legume family and contain many of the same nutrients such as B vitamins, protein, magnesium, and phosphorus. 

Magnesium helps normalize blood pressure and keeps our bones strong. Phosphorus also helps to keep our bones strong and helps our bodies make energy and move our muscles. Both of these minerals are found in abundance in beans, seeds, and tree nuts. Phosphorus is also found in dairy, eggs, in meat products, whole grains, potatoes, and dried fruit.

The goal for everyone should be to expand their diet and add more variety! A more diverse diet will lead to greater nutrient intake, and hopefully more delicious meals. If you feel like you’re in a food rut, take a chance and add something new to your routine. Your body (and likely your taste buds) will thank you!   

 

Tara McCarthy is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist who has a passion for pediatrics. She has worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for over 15 years as well as a private practice and specializes in nutrition for children with special dietary needs such as food allergies, celiac disease, FPIES, EoE, allergic colitis, and sucrose isomaltose deficiency. 

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