Viewing entries tagged
microbiome

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Humans Are Pooping Plastic

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Got your attention? Thought so. 😉

If you’re thinking, What does poop have to do with food allergies? First, food allergies affect our health and diet, which implicates our digestive tract. Number two, research is increasingly looking to the gut for answers around the rise in food allergies. For these reasons, we thought the topic was a-poo-priate. 💩

This past summer, Austrian researchers reported that the deluge of plastic entering our environment is now entering our stool. That’s right—plastic has been discovered in 114 aquatic species90% of seabirds, and now, evidently, in us. 

As part of this first-of-its-kind study, researchers followed eight volunteers from a handful of European countries, tracked their consumption habits, and then sampled their stool. Small fibers of plastic—known as microplastics—were found in all participants’ feces to varying degrees, amounting to the first documentation of plastic in human feces to date. The findings confirmed what many scientists have long suspected: we’re eating plastic.

Scientists are now grappling with the health implications, which are largely unknown. Microplastics are capable of damaging the reproductive and gastrointestinal systems in sea life, but little is known about their impact on humans.

On average, 13 billion microplastic particles enter US waterways every day through the municipal water supply. An estimated 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans each year. The latter bulk of plastic gets broken down into smaller bits, which are eaten by smaller organisms, and make their way up the food chain.

How does this relate to the food allergy and intolerance community? 

First, we know that immune health is closely tied to food allergies and intolerances. Experts have found that plastic in the gut can suppress the immune system and increase the likelihood of gastrointestinal diseases like inflammatory bowel disease. Second, research has shown that exposure to phthalates, which are found in many plastics, can increase childhood risk of allergies. According to the lead researcher of the study, Dr. Philipp Schwabi: “[my] primary concern is the human impact… especially [on] patients with gastrointestinal diseases.” He notes that “the smallest particles are capable of entering the bloodstream, the lymphatic system and may even reach the liver.”

While research on the human impact of plastic is still early, one thing is clear: plastic may be harming our immune systems, which could potentially implicate our body’s ability to tolerate and digest certain foods.

We’re eating our waste—that much is clear. Now the question is, what are we going to do about it? 

-      Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Scientists Find Link Between Antacid & Antibiotic Exposure and Food Allergies & Asthma

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As someone who remembers (with disgust) that pink goo as a child (also known as the antibiotic amoxicillin), I read this headline in shock. Did that chalky bubble gum syrup make me more susceptible to developing food allergies and asthma?

Here’s what the scientists found. 

In a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers looked at approximately 800,000 infants that had ingested antibiotics or antacids in their first six months of life. They found that those exposed were more likely to develop food allergies or asthma. 

Babies are routinely prescribed antacids for regurgitating food or experiencing acid reflux after a feeding. This is very common in infants, so you can appreciate why this study is sending shockwaves throughout the parenting community!

The research hones in on how antacids and antibiotics affect an infant’s microbiome—that place where trillions of bacteria help aid in digestion, fight infection, and regulate the immune system. We know that antibiotics kill the bad bacteria that make us sick, but they also wipe out the good stuff that keeps us healthy. Antacids similarly can help ease digestion, but a less acidic stomach can alter the bacterial composition of the intestine and reduce protein digestion

The microbiome has been a hotbed of research lately—especially in the food allergy field. As we’ve discussed in a previous post, one of the leading theories behind the rise in food allergies is the impact that chemicals and medications are having on our microbiome and gut health—especially at a young age. We’ve also previously written on gut health and the important role the microbiome plays in healthy immune function.  

“This does not mean that infants should never get antacids or antibiotics,” Dr. Claire McCarthy notes in response to the study. “Antibiotics can be lifesaving for infants with bacterial infections, and there are situations when antacids can be extremely useful.” She adds though that both medications are often overprescribed and encourages doctors to “ask if it is truly necessary [to prescribe these medications]—and whether there are any alternative treatments that might be tried.” The lead author of the study, Dr. Edward Mitre, also recommended in light of the findings that “antibiotics and acid-suppressive medications should only be used in situations of clear clinical benefit.”

The recent surge in research surrounding gut health and the microbiome is a welcome trend, and one that will hopefully lead us to more concrete answers surrounding the origin of food allergies and how to mitigate or eliminate them altogether. 

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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