Viewing entries tagged
food allergy emergency

Comment

Managing Food Allergies at the Gym and Yoga Studio

kelly-russo-1154038-unsplash.jpg

Food allergy management is not reserved for the kitchen, dining room, cafeteria, and restaurants. Food allergies follow you everywhere, from airplanes to offices, to places you would least expect—like yoga studios.

My favorite yoga teacher, who has a peanut-allergic son and maintains a peanut-free house, uses the yoga studio as her place to eat all the peanuts she can’t at home. I only learned about her son’s allergy because I spotted her spooning peanut butter right out of the jar and directly into her mouth before class one day. As a regular, there’s a good chance of her assisting me, and it is not unusual for her to lie right on top of students during a seated forward fold. 

Since we may be getting “intimate,” I knew I would have to tell her about my allergy. I explained that I was allergic to peanuts and would appreciate it if she either washed her hands or not assist me that day. Since she’s an allergy mom and understands the struggle, she was embarrassed that she had never thought of this as an issue when teaching. 

Yoga studios aren't the only place I’ve encountered my food allergies. They have shown up in locker rooms, the swimming pool, and on a marathon race course. I bet I’m not the only one who has spotted an allergen during a workout! 

As someone with many food allergies (peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, and sunflower seeds, to name a few), I’ve gotten pretty good at managing them in public workout spaces. Below are my top tips! 

Your auto-injector is your number one workout buddy.

Having your epinephrine auto-injector with you at all times is a best practice no matter where you are or what you are doing. This is especially true for the gym. The last thing you want is someone scrambling to your locker—perhaps not knowing or forgetting the lock combo—and then rummaging through your things to find your auto-injector. Keeping it in a small bag with you is a convenient way to carry it from machine to machine. Activities in extreme temperatures, like hot yoga, may require an exception to this rule.

Have a water bottle that stands out.

Just like the yoga studio was my teacher’s go-to place for snacking on peanut butter, the swimming pool is where my husband eats peanut M&Ms. Besides not kissing, we do not share water bottles when he eats peanuts! 

While unlikely, you might share the same water bottle as someone else at the gym, and you don’t want to accidentally sip from the wrong spout! When it comes to your water bottle, make sure it stands out and that you always know where it is. If you bring along a bag for your epinephrine auto-injector, you can pop your water bottle in there! Or add stickers, a name label, or tie a ribbon around your bottle to ensure it’s unique. 

Clean what you can.

Wiping down surfaces at the gym is always a good practice—food allergies or not. 

Sometimes this isn’t always an option—take bouldering, for instance. I recall one time watching people shell pistachios and then going right back to the climbing wall. In these cases, you just have to use your best judgment.

Specialty equipment at a yoga or boxing studio can also have questionable cleanliness. In these cases, it is best to bring your own mat, props, and gloves. If you’re there for the first time, or can't bring your equipment, it’s a good idea to ask how they clean their equipment or request a newly-cleaned item. You may want to wipe it down yourself just in case 😁.

Let someone know about your allergy.

When working out alone, it helps if someone knows about your food allergies. Before any yoga class, I always say something to the instructor because I’ve experienced teachers lathering students with essential oils. 

Don't be embarrassed by saying something. I used to be, but really who is it harming? Nobody! 

Managing food allergies means you have to be a little more diligent when engaging in extracurricular activities, even ones that aren't food related. Taking simple precautions to mitigate risk is all part of life with food allergies and shouldn't stop you from hitting the gym!

What tricks do you use when navigating public workout spaces? I’d love to know! 

 

Kortney Kwong Hing is the allergy girl behind the blog Allergy Girl Eats. She has multiple food allergies (peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, sunflower seeds and more), but does not let them stand in the way of enjoying food and exploring the globe. On the blog Kortney shares stories of life as an allergic adult, tips on managing everyday life with food allergies, and a few favorite allergy-friendly recipes. 

Kortney is also one of the co-founders of Allergy Travels, a website and online community that shares travel insights and inspiration for those managing allergies. 

Comment

Comment

Take Two: The Importance of Carrying Two Epinephrine Auto-injectors

With Halloween around the bend, we wanted to share a quick PSA on the importance of carrying two epinephrine auto-injectors in case of an allergic reaction. 

Why? Let’s look at the facts.

In cases of severe anaphylaxis, one dose of epinephrine is often not enough. Up to 20% of people who receive an initial dose of epinephrine for anaphylaxis require a second injection. This can happen even without further exposure to the allergenic trigger! A second allergic reaction called biphasic anaphylaxis can occur between 1 to 72 hours (typically eight hours) after the initial reaction.

Despite these harrowing stats, most individuals do not carry two auto-injectors.

In a study of roughly 1,000 US patients and caregivers with epinephrine prescriptions, 82% said they do not carry two auto-injectors. Meanwhile, 75% of respondents reported previously administering epinephrine. Of those that sought emergency care, 45% did so because a second dose of epinephrine was unavailable. 

Education and awareness is also lacking. Only a quarter of respondents reported that they were advised to carry two auto-injectors.

But epinephrine is expensive.

We hear you. Epinephrine auto-injectors are not cheap, which can make it difficult to have multiple epinephrine auto-injectors on your person at all times.  

Fortunately, that’s starting to change. Increased market competition and PR scandals like the one that rocked Mylan have helped drive down the price. 

Additionally, below are some cost-saving options worth checking out. 

-      Check for discount codes and savings plans on manufacturer websites. 

-      Purchase generic epinephrine alternatives.

-      Explore mail-order pharmacy options (you may be able to receive a larger supply of medication at a lower co-pay amount if these benefits apply).

-      Price shop between local pharmacies—prices vary, especially between large chains and small pharmacies.

-      Ask your doctor about patient assistance programs. 

-      Switch to your insurance carrier’s “preferred” auto-injector (if applicable).

-      Double check that your pharmacy has applied all possible coupons at check out.

-      Ask your company’s HR department if they offer financial assistance to employees to cover prescriptions.

We hope you all have a SWEET and SAFE Halloween! And don’t forget to TAKE TWO!

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

Comment

Comment

Food Allergies + Natural Disasters… A Different Kind of Storm

dominik-martin-100802-unsplash.jpg

As torrential floods from Hurricane Florence ripped through the Carolinas earlier this month, Madison, Wisconsin—home of the Allergy Amulet headquarters—was still reeling from record rainfall levels and flash floods. 

These events got us thinking: How should the food allergy community prepare for a natural disaster? 

First, there are great emergency kit checklists available through the American Red Cross and FEMA websites, which advise on supplies to have at the ready in case of an emergency. If you or your loved one has a food allergy, however, you have a few extra things to consider.

Tell me more.

At a minimum you should plan to have several days’ worth of allergy-friendly foods on hand that don’t require refrigeration, heating, and that don’t spoil easily. This might include canned vegetables, granola, or dried fruits and meats. Don’t forget several days’ worth of water, too! 

The American Red Cross recommends having a seven-day supply of any necessary medications. For food allergy families this could include your antihistamines as well as epinephrine, or any other doctor-recommended medications (e.g., inhaler). Depending on where you live, and what type of emergencies are most common, you may want to have these items already packed and stored in a convenient location. For example, if you live in an area prone to tornadoes, it’s likely that you have a basement, so you may want to store your emergency supplies down there.  

What if I need to evacuate?

Evacuating in the wake of a natural disaster can present unique challenges for those with food allergies. Shelters may not serve allergy-friendly meals, and even if they do, families may need to manage for cross-contact. Having allergy-friendly foods on hand and disinfectant wipes for hands and surfaces can help mitigate exposure risk. Make sure to also pack emergency action plans for children if you have them, insurance cards, and an emergency contact list with your medical providers!

Check expiration dates!

Don’t forget to review and update your emergency preparedness kit at least once a year, and make sure to check the expiration dates on your epinephrine and antihistamines. Spokin recently offered a feature on its app that helps you to manage epinephrine expiration dates.

We all hope that you never need your emergency supplies, but it’s a good idea to be prepared! 

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team 

Comment