Viewing entries tagged
OIT allergist

Comment

What To Expect When You’re Expecting…An Oral Food Challenge

My daughter, moments after finishing her first oral food challenge.

My daughter, moments after finishing her first oral food challenge.

This topic is pretty fresh in my mind as my daughter underwent an oral food challenge to macadamia nuts last week. In case you’re not familiar with an oral food challenge (OFC), or haven’t experienced one yet, let us fill you in.

Today, oral food challenges are considered the gold standard for food allergy diagnosis in children and adults alike. Skin prick and blood tests aid in diagnosis, but they are prone to error—false positives are not uncommon. You can read more about food allergy diagnosis methods in our blog Food Allergies Today: An Expert Q & A.

There are typically three reasons why you might do an oral food challenge:

1. You or your child tested positively for a food allergy but have never actually eaten the food.

2. You or your child tested positively for a food allergy and have eaten the food before with no symptoms.

3. To see if you or your child has outgrown a known food allergy.

An oral food challenge is usually held at your allergist’s office over a few-hour period. The allergist administers tiny amounts of the potential allergen in gradually increasing doses over a set period of time (usually 3-6 hours). In my experience, the whole challenge start to finish lasts around 4 hours. Once the full serving is administered, the doctor will typically observe the patient for a couple hours to monitor for signs or symptoms of an allergic reaction. If symptoms occur at any point during an OFC, the challenge stops and symptoms are treated immediately.

Importantly, not everyone is a good candidate for an OFC. According to allergist Dr. Jordan Scott, “when asthma is flaring or when patients are ill, we don’t challenge.”

Let’s talk about what to expect. First, block off the day, because even if the OFC is expected to last only a few hours, the experience can be emotionally draining and stressful. Being prepared and understanding the purpose and procedure is incredibly important! Below you’ll find a list of things to prepare ahead of time so you can tackle the challenge head on. 

Ask your allergist what he/she needs you to bring. He may ask you to provide the food for the challenge, or his office may provide the food (we’ve done both). If you’re providing the food, make sure you’ve done your homework to ensure it’s not processed in a shared facility or processed on a shared line with something else you’re allergic to. For example, when we challenged sesame a couple years ago, we ensured the hummus we brought wasn’t processed in a shared facility with nuts: my daughter’s other allergen. We didn’t want cross-contact playing a factor.

Ask your allergist what you should stop doing. Ask your allergist what medicines you need to stop taking before the challenge. Our allergist requires that we stop giving our daughter her daily antihistamines for seasonal allergies a few days before the challenge, as that could mask reaction symptoms during the OFC. Additionally, she cannot take any asthma medicine that day. However, if asthma symptoms start flaring, there’s a chance they’ll want to play it safe and reschedule your challenge anyway—clear communication with your allergist is key!

Bring lots of activities for entertainment. If the trial is for a child, I’ve found that new activities, games, and library books always help to hold their attention longer. Having a favorite stuffed “friend” or something that the child associates with comfort is helpful too. If you’re an adult, a good book and your favorite digital gadgets will probably suffice!

Pack safe snacks. If the challenge goes well, you may be at the allergist’s office for several hours. However, the tiny doses of food your allergist administers aren’t likely to fill you up ☺. We like to bring some of our daughter’s favorite tried and true snacks that we know are safe (another way to avoid bringing cross-contact into the equation!). Since the challenge is at an allergist’s office, and there will likely be patients in the near vicinity with food allergies, it’s an added bonus if you can bring foods that are free from the most common allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, egg, milk, and soy. I also bring disinfectant wipes in case the food spills so that I can clean it up properly for the next allergic patient. Good food allergy etiquette is important!

Bring your emergency medications. While this may seem unnecessary (hello, you’re at the allergist’s office ☺), it’s important. There’s always a small chance of a delayed reaction, and if that happens on the way home, you’ll want to have your epinephrine and antihistamines at the ready.

Stay calm. If you’re a parent accompanying a child to an OFC, it helps to remain calm if your child experiences an allergic reaction. “If a reaction occurs, it is important for parents to remain calm because children can pick up on the anxiety and feed on that,” allergist Dr. John Lee advises. If your child experiences a reaction, Dr. Lee also suggests that parents avoid calling it a “failed challenge” in front of their child, noting that “this can make a child feel as if they’ve somehow failed, or done something wrong.”

Leave the siblings at home. If the food challenge is for your child, it’s smart to leave any siblings at home so you can stay focused—especially in the event of an allergic reaction. Best-case scenario, your child doesn’t have a reaction and it ends up being quality time with your babe. If you’re an adult, you’ll still want to bring someone with you for support and to make sure you get home safely.

Set a course of action/next steps. Once the challenge is complete, talk to your allergist about next steps. If the challenge went well, make sure you know how to proceed with exposure to the food moving forward. If it didn’t, they may recommend future testing/follow up, and possibly strict avoidance of the food.

I hope you find these tips helpful! After experiencing my daughter’s first oral food challenge, I felt far better equipped to take on the second. In case you’re wondering, she passed her OFC to macadamia nuts! This is one nutritious food we can add back into her diet. Hooray!

If you’re interested in discussing oral food challenges further, let me know. We’ve been through several, so I know the ropes pretty well!

- Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

Comment

Comment

OIT—Is It For Me?

Feeding your peanut-allergic child peanuts is not easy as a mother—I would know, I do it every day. Your instincts as a parent are to keep your child as far out of harm’s way as possible. But in today’s world, peanuts may be the best management tool we have for my peanut-allergic child.

Let me explain.

My daughter was born with a severe allergy to peanuts and tree nuts. For the first three years of her life, we strictly avoided these foods. She’s now four. Last April, we agreed to undergo an oral food challenge at her allergist’s office to find out if she was still allergic. Her peanut blood test numbers had dropped considerably—this blood test measures levels of Immunoglobulin E (IgE) to individual allergens in the body. IgE is the antibody that triggers food allergy symptoms. Plus, she hadn’t been exposed to peanut since she was a baby. Unfortunately, the oral food challenge outcome wasn’t as we hoped: after ingesting ¼ of a peanut, split into three gradually increasing doses over a 45-minute period, she experienced an anaphylactic event and we had to administer epinephrine. It was an emotional day, to say the least.

After discovering that she was still severely allergic to peanuts, we decided to explore oral immunotherapy: a method of food desensitization that involves re-introducing the immune system to the allergenic food in gradually increasing amounts over time, with the goal of eventual tolerance.

For our family, the results have been life changing. The same little girl that reacted to ¼ of a peanut now eats 12 peanuts daily with zero symptoms. But OIT is not necessarily for everyone, so I’d like to share our family’s journey and offer some insights into the process so that you can determine whether it’s a good fit for you or your child.

If your allergist doesn’t have a clear picture of your allergy severity, treatment may start with an oral food challenge. Once the individual has been identified as an OIT candidate, they are typically provided a juice-like beverage containing tiny amounts of the allergen. This beverage is consumed during the same two-hour period every day. Depending on how quickly a patient builds up a tolerance, your allergist may recommend coming in every week or two for an “updose”—an increase in the amount of allergen consumed. As the immune system grows more tolerant, the patient eventually moves to a powder form (which is typically sprinkled onto food), and finally to solids (e.g., whole nuts).

Importantly, OIT requires a considerable time commitment. Although updosing typically occurs every week or two, the allergen must be consumed every day to build and maintain tolerance. OIT also places constraints on physical activity. During OIT, the patient can only engage in calm, quiet activity half an hour before dosing, and at least two hours afterwards (during their observation period). This ensures that the immune system doesn’t get “revved up” unnecessarily and trigger an allergic reaction.

Is OIT perfect? Not quite. For the foreseeable future, my daughter must eat 12 peanuts with a two-hour observation period everyday. However, we can now choose the time frame each day, and expect the observation period to shorten over time. There’s also a measure of unpredictability. On two occasions, our daughter developed a couple hives after her prescribed dose, and we had to give her antihistamines. Other times, we had to lower her dose because she was sick, which can compromise the immune system. It is these situations, and the risk of producing a more serious adverse outcome, that discourages many allergists from taking up the practice. Indeed, OIT is still relatively controversial. Additionally, OIT treatments are still in their nascent stages and are not widely practiced, so there is less data and information available.

Importantly, not every food-allergic child or adult is a good candidate for OIT. For example, if a patient has severe environmental allergies, acute asthma, or eosinophilic esophagitis, they will not likely qualify for OIT. Additionally, OIT treatment is not available for all allergens—desensitization to peanuts, for example, is far more common practice than, say, shellfish.

If you think OIT may be of interest to your family, I’d encourage you to talk to your allergist and seek out additional information and guidance. You can also reach out to me at mnohe@allergyamulet.com for more on the parent perspective—I’m always up for a good food allergy chat!

- Meg, Director of Strategic Development

Comment