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Food Allergy Education

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Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, Sugar is Sweet, and Food Allergies Can Be Sweet Too

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Ah, Valentine’s Day. For some, this day provides a great excuse to press pause on the stressors of life and take time to celebrate the ones you love. For those with food allergies and intolerances, however, this day can bring about a lot of anxiety. 

If you’re a food allergy parent like me, here’s what probably goes through your head: Will my child be given a valentine that contains their allergen? What will be served at school? Will they feel comfortable speaking up to ensure the treat is safe? Why does this holiday have to center around food?!

If you are celebrating Valentine’s Day as a food-allergic adult, it can be just as stressful. Valentine’s Day often comes in the form of chocolates, or a splurge on a nice dinner and dessert (in our house that means sushi)!

We get it guys. This holiday can be hard. That’s why we’ve teamed up with our friend chef Ming Tsai to bring you a homemade sweet treat this Valentine’s Day. 

Easy? Check. Healthy? Check. Top eight allergen free AND gluten free AND sesame free? Check check check. 

Here’s Chef Tsai’s recipe for Strawberry Coconut Sorbet (note: this recipe contains coconut). 

Strawberry Coconut Sorbet (serves 2)

- 1/2 cup frozen strawberries

- 1/2 cup coconut milk

- 1/4 teaspoon lemon zest

- 2 tablespoons unsweetened coconut flakes

Add strawberries, coconut milk, and zest to a blender and blend until just smooth. Serve immediately and garnish with coconut flakes or cacao nibs (or whatever your heart desires 😍).  

Enjoy friends!

XOXO, 

Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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More Adults Have Food Allergies Than Previously Believed

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Last month, we shared the latest research on food allergy trends among children. The study found that approximately 7.6%—or 6 million—kids in the U.S. have a food allergy. Now we have more breaking food allergy news to share—this time concerning adults.

In early January, The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published a study on the prevalence of food allergies among U.S. adults. What did they discover? Approximately 1 in 10 American adults (~26 million) have a food allergy. 

This brings the total number of Americans with a food allergy to approximately 32 million, more than doubling the food allergy population! Previous estimates had the population at roughly 15 million Americans.

Below are a few more key findings:

  • Adult onset of food allergies is becoming more common; nearly half of food-allergic adults have at least one food allergy that began in adulthood.

  • The most common allergies among adults are shellfish (7.2 million), milk (4.7 million), peanuts (4.5 million), tree nuts (3 million), and fin fish (2.2 million).

  • Food allergies occur more often in non-white adults than in white adults.

  • Nearly 40% of adults with a food allergy reported at least one food allergy-related ER visit in their lifetime.

  • Adults ages 30-39 had higher rates of food allergy than younger adults. Adults over 60 had lower rates than other adult age groups.

Dr. Ruchi Gupta and her team at Northwestern University conducted both the adult and pediatric studies. Consistent with their research on children, Dr. Gupta’s team applied a stringent symptom methodology, which looked at the frequency, type, and severity of allergy symptoms as part of diagnosis to filter out those who more likely had a food intolerance. 

One thing is clear: food allergies are on the rise, and we need greater education, awareness, and research on this troubling health trend. 

A big thanks to Dr. Gupta and her team for their ongoing efforts to shine a light on the rising food allergy epidemic in our country.

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Breaking Bread

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This past Christmas Eve, I listened to the soft sounds of Ave Maria and Silent Night waft through candlelit pews. My father has sung in a church choir ever since I was a child, like his father before him, so from a young age I was instilled with an appreciation for robed singers harmonizing centuries-old Latin hymns. I’m also a sucker for Christmas carols. 😉

As the communion bread was passed around among the pews, I thought about people who could not eat the bread—not because they weren’t baptized, but because they were allergic or intolerant.

Growing up, our family belonged to a small stone Episcopalian church on a grassy hill that could have been pulled out of the Scottish Highlands or a child’s storybook. At one point, we had a female priest, which was something of a rarity back then. Sermons routinely invoked global current affairs and the common values shared across religions, and everyone, regardless of creed, was welcome. We were a progressive church. The communion bread was also baked in the church kitchen and tasted heavenly. I’d walk up to the altar, cup my hands, and receive a hunk of doughy bread, which I’d dip into a chalice of wine. I can’t remember ever worrying about my food allergies during Sunday communion growing up. Plain bread as a kid was always considered safe. That has since changed. 

Today, 1 in 13 kids has a food allergy, and millions more have a gluten intolerance. We live in a different world from a couple decades back. The communion bread I ate growing up definitely contained wheat, although I never knew anyone that had a problem with gluten back then. These days, however, it seems as though at least one person at every dinner party is gluten-free. To accommodate, many churches now offer gluten-free bread with communion.

The rise of gluten-free products has been a double-edged sword for the nut-allergic like me: on the one hand, it has helped increase awareness and accommodations for those with food allergies and intolerances; on the other hand, nut substitutes (like almond flour) for wheat have become increasingly common. 

Years ago, I admittedly thought the spike in gluten-free products was more fad than the result of a growing severe medical condition. That all changed when I spoke to a woman at a food allergy conference years back who relayed the harrowing experience of her young son and how their family discovered his gluten intolerance. On Sundays, her son would develop debilitating migraines that would keep him bed ridden for days. As she described her experience, and his symptoms, I was horrified. Her family connected the dots back to the communion bread. “Gluten did that to your son!?” I thought. Unfortunately, their church wasn’t able to accommodate his gluten intolerance, and her family was forced to join another parish. 

At the Scottish storybook church, if you declined the bread or wine, you could fold your arms across your chest and receive a blessing from the priest. At the church I attended this Christmas Eve, communion bread was passed between parishioners in pews on trays, and wine (which turned out to be grape juice), was served in small plastic cups. Surprisingly, an individual blessing did not appear to be an alternative option. You’d think a simple blessing like this would be an option at all churches, allowing everyone to partake in communion and ensuring that the food allergic and intolerant aren’t left out.

Religion, like food, should bring people together. Breaking bread has long been a symbol of community and peace. That community piece is lost, however, if everyone isn’t afforded a seat at the table. 

- Abi & the Allergy Amulet Team

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Emerging Epidemic: Latest Research on Childhood Food Allergies Shows Troubling Trend

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We like to follow research in the food allergy world closely—after all, many of our team members are as personally vested as we are professionally in the advancement of food allergy research! Several of our senior team members either have food allergies or have children with food allergies. 

Last month at FABlogCon, we learned that Dr. Ruchi Gupta and her team at Northwestern University were soon releasing a new study in PediatricsThe Public Health Impact of Parent-Reported Childhood Food Allergies in the United States.

The study was published this month, and we wanted to share some key findings with you: 

  • Food allergies continue to affect a significant number of children in the United States—7.6 percent, or nearly 6 million kids, have a food allergy. Of those, 40 percent report having multiple food allergies.

  • Food allergies have a meaningful impact on families—42 percent reported a severe allergic reaction to their food allergen, and nearly 1 in 5 reported that their child had visited the emergency department for a food-allergic reaction in the past year!

  • Not everyone has emergency medicines at the ready—less than half of parents reported that their child has a current prescription for an epinephrine auto-injector, the only treatment for anaphylaxis. 

This study is a continuation of the work carried out by Dr. Gupta and her team in 2011. Their objective was to better assess the public health impact on childhood food allergies. They surveyed over 40,000 households using advanced statistical modeling to ensure they captured a representative sample of children in the United States. 

One noteworthy feature of this study was a “stringent symptom” methodology, which looked at the frequency, type, and severity of allergy symptoms as part of a diagnosis. This approach helped filter out those who did not likely have a food allergy, as several parents reported a food allergy when the symptoms were more characteristic of a food intolerance or oral allergy syndrome (OAS).

Even after applying the stricter criteria, food allergies are still a significant problem for American children. Today, 1 in 13 kids has a food allergy, which translates to 2 in every classroom. Peanut (2.2%) and milk (1.9%) are the most commonly reported food allergies, affecting 1.6 million and 1.4 million children, respectively. African American children are also more likely to have a food allergy than non-Hispanic white children and are more likely than other children to have multiple food allergies. 

Dr. Gupta (second from the left on the bottom row) and her SOAAR research team (Science and Outcomes of Allergy and Asthma Research) at Northwestern University.

Dr. Gupta (second from the left on the bottom row) and her SOAAR research team (Science and Outcomes of Allergy and Asthma Research) at Northwestern University.

We appreciate the work of Dr. Gupta and her team to increase awareness of the public health implications of food allergies. To quote from the study: “With the growing epidemic and life-threatening nature of food allergies, developing treatments and prevention strategies are critical.” 

We couldn’t agree more!

- Susannah & the Allergy Amulet Team 


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Managing Food Allergies at the Gym and Yoga Studio

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Food allergy management is not reserved for the kitchen, dining room, cafeteria, and restaurants. Food allergies follow you everywhere, from airplanes to offices, to places you would least expect—like yoga studios.

My favorite yoga teacher, who has a peanut-allergic son and maintains a peanut-free house, uses the yoga studio as her place to eat all the peanuts she can’t at home. I only learned about her son’s allergy because I spotted her spooning peanut butter right out of the jar and directly into her mouth before class one day. As a regular, there’s a good chance of her assisting me, and it is not unusual for her to lie right on top of students during a seated forward fold. 

Since we may be getting “intimate,” I knew I would have to tell her about my allergy. I explained that I was allergic to peanuts and would appreciate it if she either washed her hands or not assist me that day. Since she’s an allergy mom and understands the struggle, she was embarrassed that she had never thought of this as an issue when teaching. 

Yoga studios aren't the only place I’ve encountered my food allergies. They have shown up in locker rooms, the swimming pool, and on a marathon race course. I bet I’m not the only one who has spotted an allergen during a workout! 

As someone with many food allergies (peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, and sunflower seeds, to name a few), I’ve gotten pretty good at managing them in public workout spaces. Below are my top tips! 

Your auto-injector is your number one workout buddy.

Having your epinephrine auto-injector with you at all times is a best practice no matter where you are or what you are doing. This is especially true for the gym. The last thing you want is someone scrambling to your locker—perhaps not knowing or forgetting the lock combo—and then rummaging through your things to find your auto-injector. Keeping it in a small bag with you is a convenient way to carry it from machine to machine. Activities in extreme temperatures, like hot yoga, may require an exception to this rule.

Have a water bottle that stands out.

Just like the yoga studio was my teacher’s go-to place for snacking on peanut butter, the swimming pool is where my husband eats peanut M&Ms. Besides not kissing, we do not share water bottles when he eats peanuts! 

While unlikely, you might share the same water bottle as someone else at the gym, and you don’t want to accidentally sip from the wrong spout! When it comes to your water bottle, make sure it stands out and that you always know where it is. If you bring along a bag for your epinephrine auto-injector, you can pop your water bottle in there! Or add stickers, a name label, or tie a ribbon around your bottle to ensure it’s unique. 

Clean what you can.

Wiping down surfaces at the gym is always a good practice—food allergies or not. 

Sometimes this isn’t always an option—take bouldering, for instance. I recall one time watching people shell pistachios and then going right back to the climbing wall. In these cases, you just have to use your best judgment.

Specialty equipment at a yoga or boxing studio can also have questionable cleanliness. In these cases, it is best to bring your own mat, props, and gloves. If you’re there for the first time, or can't bring your equipment, it’s a good idea to ask how they clean their equipment or request a newly-cleaned item. You may want to wipe it down yourself just in case 😁.

Let someone know about your allergy.

When working out alone, it helps if someone knows about your food allergies. Before any yoga class, I always say something to the instructor because I’ve experienced teachers lathering students with essential oils. 

Don't be embarrassed by saying something. I used to be, but really who is it harming? Nobody! 

Managing food allergies means you have to be a little more diligent when engaging in extracurricular activities, even ones that aren't food related. Taking simple precautions to mitigate risk is all part of life with food allergies and shouldn't stop you from hitting the gym!

What tricks do you use when navigating public workout spaces? I’d love to know! 

 

Kortney Kwong Hing is the allergy girl behind the blog Allergy Girl Eats. She has multiple food allergies (peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, soy, sunflower seeds and more), but does not let them stand in the way of enjoying food and exploring the globe. On the blog Kortney shares stories of life as an allergic adult, tips on managing everyday life with food allergies, and a few favorite allergy-friendly recipes. 

Kortney is also one of the co-founders of Allergy Travels, a website and online community that shares travel insights and inspiration for those managing allergies. 

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Sesame: More Than Just a Street

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Sesame allergy has been all over the news lately. Last year, a teenage girl tragically died at Heathrow Airport after eating a Pret a Manger baguette containing sesame—the ingredient was not listed on the packaging. This incident drew attention not only to the severity of sesame allergies, but also to deficiencies in food allergy labeling. 

A growing body of research indicates that sesame allergy is on the rise. A recent study published in Pediatrics estimates that 0.2% of the U.S. population has a sesame allergy, making it the ninth most common food allergy. 

The spike in sesame allergy has triggered a closer look at the way sesame is labeled on food packaging. This past October, the FDA released a statement indicating that it was considering sesame for mandatory allergen labeling on food packaging pursuant to the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA). Enacted January 1, 2006, FALCPA imposes special labeling requirements for the top eight most common food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, wheat, eggs, milk, and soy. As you can see, the list does not currently include sesame. That could soon change. Notably, Canada, the European Union, Australia, and Israel currently require allergen labeling for sesame. 

For those out there managing a sesame allergy, know that you are amazing. Sesame is insidious, and because it does not fall within FALCPA labeling laws, it is infinitely harder to manage. 

If you’ve followed us for a while, you know that I have a daughter with serious food allergies to peanuts and tree nuts. She was diagnosed with these food allergies at one and is now six (and crushing Kindergarten!). What I haven’t mentioned is that from ages two through three we avoided sesame like the plague because of an anaphylactic reaction she’d had to hummus just before her second birthday.

She’d eaten hummus multiple times previously, but one day, while eating hummus at lunch, her lips began turning blue and she started coughing. One epinephrine auto-injector, several hours at our children’s hospital, and some IgE blood testing later, she was home safely with a new food allergy added to the list: sesame. 

Sesame often hides under the guise of “natural flavors” or “spices” on food labels. I used to keep a spreadsheet of every manufacturer I called knowing the ingredient could be lurking behind these vague categories. To make matters worse, some manufacturers won’t share this information, citing trade secret protection. I quickly learned that I had more success if I asked if sesame was included as an ingredient in any of these proprietary categories, as opposed to asking for the whole ingredient list. Sesame also lurks under different names like tahini, a paste made from sesame seeds. If you’re managing a sesame allergy, here’s a great list of food and non-food items that may contain sesame or any of its derivatives. 

It’s been over four years since my daughter’s anaphylactic reaction, and I can joyfully say that she’s outgrown her sesame allergy. But it was no walk in the park to manage, and I still vividly remember my sesame spreadsheet and the tears of frustration that went along with tracking all of the different food ingredients. 

For those managing a sesame allergy, the struggle is real, and FALCPA labeling for sesame would make things a LOT easier! Interestingly, the Pediatrics study we referenced earlier cited that the highest rates of epinephrine auto-injector prescriptions were found for children with peanut, tree nut, and SESAME allergies.

We’ll be following the regulatory deliberations closely, and will be sure to keep you all updated on social media as the discussion unfolds. Do you or does your child have a sesame allergy? What’s your experience been like?

 - Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Ming Tsai’s Food For Thought

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My journey with food allergies began when I opened my first restaurant, Blue Ginger, in 1998. I felt it was important that our kitchen be mindful of food allergies to ensure that all customers could safely dine with us. Little did I know that soon enough food allergies would become an enormous part of my everyday life. 

Just a few years after opening Blue Ginger, my oldest son was diagnosed with multiple food allergies; in fact, he was born severely allergic to soy, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, shellfish, and eggs. At first, as a chef, I thought it was an unfunny joke from upstairs. But I soon realized it would be an invaluable lesson and opportunity. I quickly learned that trying to eat at restaurants with food allergies was a much larger task than I imagined. Even though I had established protocols in my restaurant for those with food allergies, most other restaurants didn’t take the same care. I can recall a few times where my family and I were turned away because the chef or restaurant did not want to accommodate us. There were a few occasions where my son was accidentally served a dish containing a small amount of one of his allergens, and within minutes he began exhibiting symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction. As a parent, it’s one the scariest experiences. Thankfully, my wife is a trained nurse, and we were able to spot the signs quickly and administer epinephrine right away. 

First implemented at Blue Ginger, and later at Blue Dragon (which is 100% peanut and tree nut free), we created a book that includes every dish on the menu and a comprehensive list of ingredients separated by dish components (i.e. proteins, starches, vegetables, sauces, and garnishes). This way, the patron and restaurant staff can easily determine which part of the dish has the allergen and omit the item from their order. For example, a customer with a peanut allergy would still be able to have the Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce by opting for an alternate (and equally delicious) dipping sauce. 

Additionally, any ingredient processed and received from outside vendors is starred and the ingredients are indexed in our system (e.g., dried *egg* pasta). A highlighted ingredient indicates that it is one of the top eight food allergens: peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, shellfish, fish, milk, or egg. Our protocols also ensure proper lines of communication between the front of house staff and the kitchen. Every manager, server, and bartender is trained to ensure all customers can safely dine with us. You can find an example of our documentation here.

My family’s experiences, and the knowledge that comes with being a restaurant owner and chef, inspired me to champion the first bill in Massachusetts to require all local restaurants to comply with food allergy awareness guidelines. It took four years working with the Massachusetts legislature to write Bill S. 2701, which was eventually signed into law in early 2009.  

I’m incredibly proud of the work that we’ve done in Massachusetts to help those with food allergies have a more positive restaurant experience. As a chef, restaurateur, and a food allergy parent, I’ve experienced this issue from multiple sides. From the customer perspective, it’s important to notify the restaurant when making the reservation, triple-check that the server understands the severity of the allergy, and do a final check when the food arrives at the table for any visible cross-contact with your allergen or mistakes. Food allergies are a two-way street. From the restaurant perspective, we need to have procedures in place to make sure customers can safely eat, but we also need to be made aware of any allergies and understand the severity so that we can accommodate. Over the years, I’ve developed a useful and effective way to better determine the severity of people’s food allergies. I ask, “Is using the same fryer okay?” The point we are getting at here is if shrimp is fried in a fryer, could the customer eat fries out of that same fryer? Depending on the answer we then have a better understanding as to the severity of the food allergy, which we use as a directive to the kitchen staff. 

Restaurants should care about food allergies not only because it keeps their patrons safe, but also because it’s smart business. The hospitality industry can be challenging, and meeting customer’s demands is always of the utmost importance. At the end of the day, we are all fighting for loyal customers. 

I guarantee you, if you serve a food allergy customer a delicious and safe meal, and they leave smiling, you’ll have a customer for life.

Peace and Good Eating, 

Chef Ming Tsai

 

Ming Tsai holds an equity stake in Allergy Amulet.

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Killer Beauty Regimens

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When we think about managing food allergies, we don’t tend to consider lipstick or lotion. But we should.

Walking down the aisle of my local co-op recently, I grabbed a tub of moisturizer labeled “tester” and applied a dab to my hand. I tried placing the scent, and when I couldn’t, turned the jar around and saw almond oil listed as the first ingredient. My stomach clenched, and a variant of “shoot” slipped from my mouth. I’m deathly allergic to tree nuts. I washed my hands immediately, and fortunately, I was fine. Historically, my worst skin exposure outcome is hives. However, given the unpredictability of allergic reactions, it’s still hard not to panic. 

You’d think after all these years and several close calls I’d be more careful; but when it comes to skincare and beauty products, I routinely let down my guard. I shouldn’t.

Did I sufficiently give you a fright? 

Good. Sometimes a little fear is a good thing. Especially when you’re talking about something as serious as an allergic reaction! 

For the food allergic, even moderate skin exposure can be serious. Creams, soaps, oils, make-up, lipstick, and balms can also lead to small amounts of ingestion, so it’s important for those with food allergies and their loved ones to vet these items with the same diligence they do foods. Don’t forget vitamins, teas, and herbal supplements, too! 

Beware the two S’s: spas and salons. 

Planning a massage, manicure, or haircut? Make sure you tell your massage therapist or stylist to avoid products containing your allergen. This is especially true if you’re allergic to nuts—you’d be surprised how many spas and salons use nut oils. Just last month while getting my haircut I was surrounded by advertisements for the salon’s newest cherry almond shampoos and conditioners. Suffice it to say, I steered clear of this product line. 😉 

FDA labeling laws and cosmetics.

Skincare and beauty products are not regulated in the same way that foods are for allergens—even if they contain a common allergenic ingredient! 

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA), which we explore in an earlier blog, applies to FDA-regulated food products, not cosmetics and beauty products. Accordingly, these products do not need to adhere to FALCPA labeling requirements, although many brands list these ingredients anyway. Regardless, it’s worth taking note.

We hope this information hasn’t spooked you, although it is Halloween season! Rather, we hope this knowledge helps you stay informed and safe when managing your food allergies. So before you slather on some blood-red lipstick this All Hallow’s Eve, check that label!

Wishing you all a BOO-tiful Halloween! 👻🎃

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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Take Two: The Importance of Carrying Two Epinephrine Auto-injectors

With Halloween around the bend, we wanted to share a quick PSA on the importance of carrying two epinephrine auto-injectors in case of an allergic reaction. 

Why? Let’s look at the facts.

In cases of severe anaphylaxis, one dose of epinephrine is often not enough. Up to 20% of people who receive an initial dose of epinephrine for anaphylaxis require a second injection. This can happen even without further exposure to the allergenic trigger! A second allergic reaction called biphasic anaphylaxis can occur between 1 to 72 hours (typically eight hours) after the initial reaction.

Despite these harrowing stats, most individuals do not carry two auto-injectors.

In a study of roughly 1,000 US patients and caregivers with epinephrine prescriptions, 82% said they do not carry two auto-injectors. Meanwhile, 75% of respondents reported previously administering epinephrine. Of those that sought emergency care, 45% did so because a second dose of epinephrine was unavailable. 

Education and awareness is also lacking. Only a quarter of respondents reported that they were advised to carry two auto-injectors.

But epinephrine is expensive.

We hear you. Epinephrine auto-injectors are not cheap, which can make it difficult to have multiple epinephrine auto-injectors on your person at all times.  

Fortunately, that’s starting to change. Increased market competition and PR scandals like the one that rocked Mylan have helped drive down the price. 

Additionally, below are some cost-saving options worth checking out. 

-      Check for discount codes and savings plans on manufacturer websites. 

-      Purchase generic epinephrine alternatives.

-      Explore mail-order pharmacy options (you may be able to receive a larger supply of medication at a lower co-pay amount if these benefits apply).

-      Price shop between local pharmacies—prices vary, especially between large chains and small pharmacies.

-      Ask your doctor about patient assistance programs. 

-      Switch to your insurance carrier’s “preferred” auto-injector (if applicable).

-      Double check that your pharmacy has applied all possible coupons at check out.

-      Ask your company’s HR department if they offer financial assistance to employees to cover prescriptions.

We hope you all have a SWEET and SAFE Halloween! And don’t forget to TAKE TWO!

-      Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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Food Allergies + Natural Disasters… A Different Kind of Storm

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As torrential floods from Hurricane Florence ripped through the Carolinas earlier this month, Madison, Wisconsin—home of the Allergy Amulet headquarters—was still reeling from record rainfall levels and flash floods. 

These events got us thinking: How should the food allergy community prepare for a natural disaster? 

First, there are great emergency kit checklists available through the American Red Cross and FEMA websites, which advise on supplies to have at the ready in case of an emergency. If you or your loved one has a food allergy, however, you have a few extra things to consider.

Tell me more.

At a minimum you should plan to have several days’ worth of allergy-friendly foods on hand that don’t require refrigeration, heating, and that don’t spoil easily. This might include canned vegetables, granola, or dried fruits and meats. Don’t forget several days’ worth of water, too! 

The American Red Cross recommends having a seven-day supply of any necessary medications. For food allergy families this could include your antihistamines as well as epinephrine, or any other doctor-recommended medications (e.g., inhaler). Depending on where you live, and what type of emergencies are most common, you may want to have these items already packed and stored in a convenient location. For example, if you live in an area prone to tornadoes, it’s likely that you have a basement, so you may want to store your emergency supplies down there.  

What if I need to evacuate?

Evacuating in the wake of a natural disaster can present unique challenges for those with food allergies. Shelters may not serve allergy-friendly meals, and even if they do, families may need to manage for cross-contact. Having allergy-friendly foods on hand and disinfectant wipes for hands and surfaces can help mitigate exposure risk. Make sure to also pack emergency action plans for children if you have them, insurance cards, and an emergency contact list with your medical providers!

Check expiration dates!

Don’t forget to review and update your emergency preparedness kit at least once a year, and make sure to check the expiration dates on your epinephrine and antihistamines. Spokin recently offered a feature on its app that helps you to manage epinephrine expiration dates.

We all hope that you never need your emergency supplies, but it’s a good idea to be prepared! 

- Susannah and the Allergy Amulet Team 

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