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As someone who remembers (with disgust) that pink goo as a child (also known as the antibiotic amoxicillin), I read this headline in shock. Did that chalky bubble gum syrup make me more susceptible to developing food allergies and asthma?

Here’s what the scientists found. 

In a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers looked at approximately 800,000 infants that had ingested antibiotics or antacids in their first six months of life. They found that those exposed were more likely to develop food allergies or asthma. 

Babies are routinely prescribed antacids for regurgitating food or experiencing acid reflux after a feeding. This is very common in infants, so you can appreciate why this study is sending shockwaves throughout the parenting community!

The research hones in on how antacids and antibiotics affect an infant’s microbiome—that place where trillions of bacteria help aid in digestion, fight infection, and regulate the immune system. We know that antibiotics kill the bad bacteria that make us sick, but they also wipe out the good stuff that keeps us healthy. Antacids similarly can help ease digestion, but a less acidic stomach can alter the bacterial composition of the intestine and reduce protein digestion

The microbiome has been a hotbed of research lately—especially in the food allergy field. As we’ve discussed in a previous post, one of the leading theories behind the rise in food allergies is the impact that chemicals and medications are having on our microbiome and gut health—especially at a young age. We’ve also previously written on gut health and the important role the microbiome plays in healthy immune function.  

“This does not mean that infants should never get antacids or antibiotics,” Dr. Claire McCarthy notes in response to the study. “Antibiotics can be lifesaving for infants with bacterial infections, and there are situations when antacids can be extremely useful.” She adds though that both medications are often overprescribed and encourages doctors to “ask if it is truly necessary [to prescribe these medications]—and whether there are any alternative treatments that might be tried.” The lead author of the study, Dr. Edward Mitre, also recommended in light of the findings that “antibiotics and acid-suppressive medications should only be used in situations of clear clinical benefit.”

The recent surge in research surrounding gut health and the microbiome is a welcome trend, and one that will hopefully lead us to more concrete answers surrounding the origin of food allergies and how to mitigate or eliminate them altogether. 

- Abi and the Allergy Amulet Team

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