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Something in our world is changing. Our bodies are rejecting the food we eat. Even the experts don’t really know why.

In January, Netflix debuted an original six-part documentary series titled Rotten. The series travels deep into the heart of the food supply chain to reveal more than a few unsavory truths about what we eat. Of particular interest to the Allergy Amulet team was the second part of the series: The Peanut Problem.

This episode surveys experts across different fields to understand why the US has witnessed a surge in food allergies in recent decades—more specifically, to peanuts.

According to Dr. Ruchi Gupta of Lurie Children’s Hospital, one in four kids with a food allergy is allergic to peanuts, and more than half of those kids have experienced a life-threatening allergic reaction. 

The problem has become so widespread, in fact, that the peanut industry is beginning to take action. Peanut farmers have started pouring millions of dollars into food allergy research to help address the problem. To date, the National Peanut Board has donated approximately $22M to food allergy research. One company is even developing an allergy-free peanut, which could be on the market as early as next year. 

Peanuts are in trouble. In only a few years they have seen their reputation transform.

The Rotten series artfully underscores the risks that dining out presents. Responsible for nearly half of food allergy fatalities, restaurants have emerged as battlegrounds for those managing food allergies. Chefs must routinely navigate these food allergy minefields—and most kitchens are ill-equipped for the job.

We bend over backwards to make sure our food is safe. Bend over backwards because it’s life and death. – Ming Tsai, Head Chef, Blue Dragon

Surprisingly, no one really knows what’s going on. Doctors are still struggling with what seems to be a simple question: why the increase in food allergies? And why now?

According to Dr. Gupta, it’s likely a combination of genetics and our environment, with environmental factors triggering changes to the composition of our microbiome.

Getting your immune system to know this is ok, that in and of itself would be incredible. – Dr. Ruchi Gupta, Lurie Children’s Hospital

Some of the leading theories discussed in this segment, which we also discuss in an earlier post, include:

-       Microbiome changes: how antibiotic usage in infants and other environmental factors have affected our gut bacteria.

-       Clean state: the idea that the modern world is too clean and the lack of early exposure to dirt, bacteria, and animals weakens the immune system.

-       Early avoidance: for the past decade allergists have advised parents to avoid introducing allergenic foods early in life—it turns out early introduction may prevent the onset of food allergies.  

Much remains uncertain as to the reason for the rise in food allergies, and there is not yet a cure on the horizon. In the interim, management tools, standard precautionary measures (always carry epinephrine!), and treatment options like OIT can make living with food allergies a little easier.

We highly recommend carving out some time to watch this series—you won’t be disappointed.  Whether you have a food allergy, care for someone that does, or simply care about the food you eat—this series has something for everyone.

-       Meg and the Allergy Amulet Team

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